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A photograph of Summer ‘CJ’ Morningstar Fowler, of the Gitanmaax First Nation near Hazelton, B.C., is displayed as her mother Matilda Fowler weeps during a news conference in Vancouver, B.C., on Wednesday. December 12, 2012. The body of her daughter was found in Kamloops December 5, an autopsy confirmed it was homicide but RCMP haven't released details of how she died. The family and the Assembly of First Nations is calling for a national public inquiry into missing and murdered aboriginal women. Commissioner Wally Oppal's inquiry report into serial killer Robert Pickton will be made public on Monday. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Darryl Dyck (DARRYL DYCK/THE CANADIAN PRESS)
A photograph of Summer ‘CJ’ Morningstar Fowler, of the Gitanmaax First Nation near Hazelton, B.C., is displayed as her mother Matilda Fowler weeps during a news conference in Vancouver, B.C., on Wednesday. December 12, 2012. The body of her daughter was found in Kamloops December 5, an autopsy confirmed it was homicide but RCMP haven't released details of how she died. The family and the Assembly of First Nations is calling for a national public inquiry into missing and murdered aboriginal women. Commissioner Wally Oppal's inquiry report into serial killer Robert Pickton will be made public on Monday. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Darryl Dyck (DARRYL DYCK/THE CANADIAN PRESS)

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Teen’s death renews call for inquiry into murdered first nations women Add to ...

The parents of an aboriginal girl found murdered last week in Kamloops have joined the call for a national inquiry into murdered and missing first nations women.

Matilda Fowler and Glen Wilson, the parents of 16-year-old CJ Fowler, joined Assembly of First Nations National Chief Shawn Atleo and other aboriginal leaders in Vancouver to renew the demand for the government to look into such tragedies.

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Matilda Fowler told a news conference that in their grief they have gained comfort from leaders who are advocating on behalf of her family and others who have lost loved ones.

Chief Atleo says the girl’s death has triggered an overwhelmingly painful reminder in all first nations communities across Canada and they won’t rest until safety and security for their peoples is achieved.

First Nations Summit Chief Ed John says the death of CJ is a terrible tragedy and another horrific example of violence against aboriginal women.

The demand comes as RCMP in Kamloops reveal that the teenager was last seen early in the morning on Dec. 5, walking down a main street to catch a bus to her Terrace home.

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