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These computer generated renderings depict the Strand East development in a neighbourhood designed by furniture giant Ikea. The images are urban design concepts only. (LandProp Services/LandProp Services)
These computer generated renderings depict the Strand East development in a neighbourhood designed by furniture giant Ikea. The images are urban design concepts only. (LandProp Services/LandProp Services)

Ikea-land and other things you may have missed this week Add to ...

I'll toast to that

You've heard the claims, but do you really need to drink eight glasses of water or pop a Vitamin D pill every day? Dave McGinn sorts through the science and finds which foods, drinks and supplements you should include in your daily routine. (My favourite finding: red wine gets a thumbs up.)

Spring clean your finances

For most people, financial housekeeping is about as desirable as getting a flu shot. The tedious task, however, is worth the hassle and can be done in just 15 minutes a day. Don't believe it? Here are four chores to get you started.

Welcome to Ikea-land, Allen-keys not required

Ikea has invaded dorm rooms, family rooms and doctors' offices. But the Swedish furniture giant is thinking bigger, with plans to build and operate entire neighbourhoods. What does Ikea-land look like? Doug Saunders travels to the far reaches of East London to give us a sense.

A leather shoulder to cry on

Had a bad day? Need a place to just let it all out? There's somewhere you can go and let the tears run freely. A place that doesn't judge, won't tell anyone and provides relative privacy. That place is your car, and Andrew Clark explains why people - particularly men - love to have a good cry there.

Fuzzy wuzzy was a dinosaur?

The Tyrannosaurus rex had sharp claws, a killer jaw, and a fluffy coat? A new fossil discovery in northeastern China suggests the fearsome creature had feathers that would have felt like "long, thick fur;" not that anyone would have gotten close enough to find out. As the researchers point out, feathers don’t “make it less threatening."

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