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Indigenous and Northern Affairs Minister Carolyn Bennett answers a question during question period in the House of Commons on Parliament Hill in Ottawa on Tuesday, November 1, 2016. In a joint letter, Bennett, Immigration Minister John McCallum and Public Safety Minister Ralph Goodale said an adviser would be appointed to oversee issues surrounding border crossing among First Nations peoples. (Adrian Wyld/THE CANADIAN PRESS)
Indigenous and Northern Affairs Minister Carolyn Bennett answers a question during question period in the House of Commons on Parliament Hill in Ottawa on Tuesday, November 1, 2016. In a joint letter, Bennett, Immigration Minister John McCallum and Public Safety Minister Ralph Goodale said an adviser would be appointed to oversee issues surrounding border crossing among First Nations peoples. (Adrian Wyld/THE CANADIAN PRESS)

Canada

Adviser to be appointed on border crossing for First Nations Add to ...

The federal government is set to appoint a special ministerial representative to look at border crossing issues faced by First Nations.

In a joint letter written in response to a Senate committee study, Indigenous Affairs Minister Carolyn Bennett, Immigration Minister John McCallum and Public Safety Minister Ralph Goodale say the adviser and First Nations will discuss significant and complex challenges.

It also says the resolution of these issues will require a “horizontal approach” involving several departments and agencies.

The ministers say the results of the engagement between the representative and First Nations will shape the work of an interdepartmental committee of senior officials.

The Senate committee on aboriginal peoples outlined border crossing issues in its June report.

The committee said some First Nations believe they should have the right to freely cross the Canada-U.S. border, based on the 1794 Jay Treaty between Britain and the U.S.

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