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Research In Motion’s BlackBerry smartphone handsets are pictured in this illustration picture taken in Lavigny, July 21, 2012. Samsung says it has not considered buying the Canadian tech company. (VALENTIN FLAURAUD/REUTERS)
Research In Motion’s BlackBerry smartphone handsets are pictured in this illustration picture taken in Lavigny, July 21, 2012. Samsung says it has not considered buying the Canadian tech company. (VALENTIN FLAURAUD/REUTERS)

'BlackBerry shame' and other things you may have missed this week Add to ...

For many of us, Monday to Friday races by in a blur. We know it can be a struggle to delve beyond the big headlines and keep on top of all the interesting stories out there. We’re here to lend a hand: In case you didn’t see them the first time, a collection of stories you may have missed this week on globeandmail.com.

More Related to this Story

Logo motion

After 30 years with the same ‘do, Wendy is finally get a makeover. Fast-food chain Wendy’s released a revamped logo last week, in hopes that fresh branding will help the company attract a new, younger clientele. But will a new look be enough to pry the kids away from their Big Macs?

A stiff drink – and bill

“One recent morning I consumed more than $600 in whisky,” writes Globe wine columnist Beppi Crosariol. See what happened next.

From baller to benched

When a 25-year-old Shaquille O’Neal strained his abdominal muscles back in 1997 during his second year playing for the Los Angeles Lakers, he turned to a Canadian for treatment. Alex McKechnie, Shaq’s “guy in Canada,” has since established himself as one of the country’s top physiotherapists with a slew of celebrity endorsements. So why is he having trouble getting his latest project off the ground?

#firstworldproblems

Do you sneak into the washroom to send text messages on your BlackBerry? Do you keep your BlackBerry hidden under notepads during meetings, away from your colleagues’ shiny iPhones or Android devices? You might be suffering from BlackBerry shame, explains Erin Anderssen.

Tit for tat

What should you do if your kids are tattletales? Ignore them, says clinical psychologist Anthony E. Wolf. It may seem harsh, Mr. Wolf says, but it’s also surprisingly effective.

Follow on Twitter: @annhui

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