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A stretcher lies next to human remains found in a jungle by Cambodian police, near Siem Reap May 1, 2014. Cambodian police discovered the body on Thursday thought to be that of being missing Canadian journalist and author Dave Walker who disappeared in February, police and friend of Walker's said. (STRINGER/CAMBODIA/Reuters)
A stretcher lies next to human remains found in a jungle by Cambodian police, near Siem Reap May 1, 2014. Cambodian police discovered the body on Thursday thought to be that of being missing Canadian journalist and author Dave Walker who disappeared in February, police and friend of Walker's said. (STRINGER/CAMBODIA/Reuters)

Body of missing Canadian Dave Walker found in Cambodia Add to ...

Dave Walker, a Canadian filmmaker who went missing in Cambodia in February, has been found dead, according to a statement from his family

A statement issued on behalf of Walker’s family says his body was reportedly discovered by a child at the Angkor Wat temples in Siem Reap, Cambodia.

Cambodian law enforcement officials told the family it appeared Walker had died several weeks ago

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The statement says a doctor at the site was unable to determine a cause of death and an autopsy will be held to try to determine how and when Walker died.

Walker, who was 58, had been living in Cambodia for the past year and a half. He was staying at a guest house when he stepped out while a housekeeper tended to his room and was not seen again.

The disappearance baffled family and friends, who said Walker spoke the language, knew the streets and was familiar with the local culture.

Walker and a partner had set up a film company in Siem Reap in July 2012 called Animist Farm Films. They had recently been working on a documentary about the Khmer Rouge regime, which left close to two million people dead.

Walker grew up in Edmonton but last lived in Toronto, where he studied for a Masters degree at York University in 2009. His family said he has lived and worked in Southeast Asia on and off for years.

He also co-authored a non-fiction book, called Hello My Big Big Honey, which chronicles the experiences of Bangkok bar girls and their Western admirers.

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