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In this OPP handout photo from CTV, a train car is seen in a river after a bridge collapse caused a Canadian Pacific train to derail. (Frank Elsner/Ontario Provincial Police via CTV)

In this OPP handout photo from CTV, a train car is seen in a river after a bridge collapse caused a Canadian Pacific train to derail.

(Frank Elsner/Ontario Provincial Police via CTV)

Clean up continues at site of train derailment near Sudbury, Ont. Add to ...

Canadian Pacific says work is continuing to clean up the site of a freight train derailment east of Sudbury.

CP says there’s no sign of any danger to the public or environment after a car derailed and hit a trestle bridge near Wanup on Sunday, causing the bridge to collapse and several cars of containers to fall into the Wahnapitae River.

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Spokesman Ed Greenberg says about 12 of the 24 containers involved in the incident were considered to have reached the water.

He says crews continued to work Monday to remove containers that made it to the water, and that four containers remained in the water as of mid-morning.

Greenberg says environmental experts with the company are overseeing the removal of the remaining containers – which contained packaged, off-the-shelf consumer products – and are working with Sudbury officials.

Among the precautions being taken are water sampling and placement of containment booms and absorbent booms around the remaining containers.

Canadian Pacific says it is using detour routes to continue transporting shipments. No one was injured in the incident.

Greenberg said Sunday that an initial investigation found one of the rail cars had an unexpected wheel bearing failure that caused the derailment just before the trestle bridge.

“Our early investigation indicates this incident is the result of an unexpected and catastrophic wheel bearing failure that could not have been detected in advance,” Greenberg said in an e-mail.

Canadian Pacific has a network of electronic inspection systems that didn’t detect any problem with the rail car wheels or bearings prior to the derailment, he added.

The Transportation Safety Board has sent a team of investigators to the scene to investigate the incident.

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