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A pair of Komodo dragons go nose to nose at the Bronx Zoo in New York. Komodos are carnivores native to islands in Indonesia and have long forked tongues, big claws and mouths full of sharp teeth. (JULIE LARSEN MAHER/ASSOCIATED PRESS)
A pair of Komodo dragons go nose to nose at the Bronx Zoo in New York. Komodos are carnivores native to islands in Indonesia and have long forked tongues, big claws and mouths full of sharp teeth. (JULIE LARSEN MAHER/ASSOCIATED PRESS)

Dragons west: Calgary Zoo gets five Komodos Add to ...

Dragons are coming to Calgary, but these giant reptiles can’t fly.

Five Komodo dragons will soon be living in the Eurasia section of the Calgary Zoo, including 28-year-old Loka, the oldest female Komodo in captivity.

Komodos are carnivores native to islands in Indonesia and have long forked tongues, big claws and mouths full of sharp teeth.

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Mature males can grow up to 3.5 metres long.

In the wild they eat goats, wild boar, smaller dragons, horses, water buffalo and deer.

Experts estimate there are only about 3,000 to 5,000 Komodos left in the world.

Loka is from the Toronto Zoo and the four others are coming from a zoo in Colchester, U.K.

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