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A paper out Tuesday finds offering better career education and an early guarantee of financial aid to lower-income high-school students has a “significant” effect on boosting their enrolment in post-secondary studies. (Fred Lum/The Globe and Mail)
A paper out Tuesday finds offering better career education and an early guarantee of financial aid to lower-income high-school students has a “significant” effect on boosting their enrolment in post-secondary studies. (Fred Lum/The Globe and Mail)

The Roundup

Education Ticker: Gifted inequities, degree race must stop Add to ...

The best of the web on education from kindergarten to postsecondary, as chosen by Globe and Mail education editor Simona Chiose.

Opting into gifted or opting out?

Kids from wealthier and white families are over-represented in the gifted programs offered by the New York public school system. In comparison, the general stream is so lacking in challenge that even a teacher says she would only allow her kids to be enrolled in enriched classes.

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Stop the race to more education

Gifted programs in primary and high school can allow students to access better university educations, better graduate schools and better – read higher-paying – professions. Sometimes, though, less is better. Let’s end the spiral of qualification, writes Peter Wilby, and replace it with enthusiasm and apprenticeships.

Kids benefit from Luddite notions of technology

Digital native Douglas Rushkoff argues that kids’ comfort level with technology should not blind parents to the need for a domestic digital policy. Starting with limiting all screen time to 20 minutes twice a day. Yes, he’s tough but gives good reasons, including the development of spatial and sensory awareness.

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