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Undated handout photo of Rhodes Scholar student Suzanne Newing. (Handout)
Undated handout photo of Rhodes Scholar student Suzanne Newing. (Handout)

Meet Canada’s 11 new Rhodes Scholars Add to ...

By the time Mr. Pedde began studying economics, math and engineering at Dartmouth, he was already a licensed pilot for the Royal Canadian Air Cadets in 691 “Hawk” Squadron, near the farm where he grew up east of Regina. But it was volunteer work in Africa and India through The Sharing Way, a relief and development organization, that shaped his worldview, and he now plans to continue studying economics at Oxford, analyzing the 2008 financial crisis.

How does one win the Rhodes?

Beyond what is described on the Rhodes Trust’s website, I honestly don’t know. I was amazed by the other finalists I met on Friday evening – they were all intelligent, very articulate, and personable individuals. I am simply honoured to have been selected.

What is the one change you’d like to see in the education system so that students can reach their potential?

Some recent academic research has shown that a great teacher has a positive impact upon her students not only whilst they are in school but for many years thereafter. I have been fortunate to have had several great teachers over the years. We need to do a better job of identifying and recognizing these great teachers.

What are you most looking forward to about your time at Oxford?

I am looking forward to interacting with and learning from people from all over the world. Based on my brief experience at Oxford last fall, I believe that the faculty and my peers will challenge me to think critically about important issues facing Canada and the world.

 

Yan Yu – University of Calgary

More than 9,000 physicians in more than 100 countries have accessed the Calgary Guide to Understanding Disease, and Yan Yu led its development. A medical student at the University of Calgary and Queen’s University graduate, he moved to Calgary in 1999 from China and is interested in health-care innovation. A nature photographer and mountain trail runner, he will split his time at Oxford doing an MBA and a master’s in public policy.

How does one win the Rhodes?

By working hard at doing what you love, connecting meaningfully with other people, and, during interview weekend, have fun.

What is the one change you’d like to see in the education system so that students can reach their potential?

I believe Sir Ken Robinson is right in suggesting that education needs to be individualized to suit the unique needs and strengths of each student. To that end, teachers should be given the flexibility to deviate from standardized curricula as needed, and help students find their areas of strength.

What are you most looking forward to about your time at Oxford?

Practising my British accent. Just kidding. Meeting the other Rhodes Scholars, and forming new, lifelong friendships!

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ONTARIO

Joseph Singh – Dartmouth College (United States)

Mr. Singh has his sights set on a career in Canada’s foreign service, having studied international security policy at Dartmouth, in New Hampshire. He has already made his voice heard on security and defence matters, publishing pieces with Foreign Policy, Time and CNN, and has done research as an intern at the OECD and the Institute for Near East and Gulf Military Analysis. But he also sings for the Dartmouth Aires – an all-male a cappella group that was a runner-up on NBC’s The Sing-Off.

How does one win the Rhodes?

The number one takeaway from the interview process seemed to be this: The Rhodes scholarship is not a reward for past accomplishments, but an investment in the promise of future impact. It’s not just about having good grades, athletic and creative pursuits, demonstrating leadership, etc. It’s about showing how all these things come together to enable you to have impact and to demonstrate that you have a plan to change the world for the better.

What is the one change you’d like to see in the education system so that students can reach their potential?

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