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Molver Desir, owner of Nini's Gift shop stands in her damaged shop in Jacmel, Haiti, Feb. 10, 2010. Desir lost a significant amount of stock in the earthquake and is also in a great deal of debt because her husband is ill. (Deborah Baic/THE GLOBE AND MAIL)
Molver Desir, owner of Nini's Gift shop stands in her damaged shop in Jacmel, Haiti, Feb. 10, 2010. Desir lost a significant amount of stock in the earthquake and is also in a great deal of debt because her husband is ill. (Deborah Baic/THE GLOBE AND MAIL)

Awards

Globe wins five National Newspaper Awards Add to ...

The Globe and Mail has been awarded five 2010 National Newspaper Awards, more than any other paper.

The NNAs, one of the top honours for Canadian print journalism, were given out on Friday evening in Ottawa. The Globe scored second straight wins for designer Jason Chiu for presentation and Africa correspondent Geoffrey York in international reporting. The paper also scooped up awards for multimedia, business and cartooning.

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“This is a great recognition for what we strive to produce every hour and every day: quality journalism that makes a difference to Canada,” said editor-in-chief John Stackhouse. “We’re thrilled for the winners, and proud of all our nominees whose outstanding work both enlightened and challenged our readers.”

The Toronto Star and Montreal’s La Presse received three awards each, while the Hamilton Spectator, The Gazette in Montreal and the Canadian Press news agency took home two apiece.

Smaller newspapers fared well this year, with the Brandon Sun, Nanaimo Daily News and the Lethbridge Herald all taking an award each, which was also the tally for the Vancouver Sun and the New Brunswick Telegraph-Journal.

Multimedia: Jessica Leeder and Deborah Baic

Reporter Ms. Leeder and Ms. Baic, a photographer, visited the Haitian town of Jacmel over a five-month period and produced a series of feature stories, videos, photo galleries and blog posts about the town in the aftermath of the quake. In addition to the personal stories of local residents, the series, Project Jacmel, also looked at the politics and social dynamics behind the rebuilding efforts.

Presentation: Jason Chiu

Mr. Chiu, who played a large role in The Globe’s redesign, was awarded for his work on several front pages, including one that used a blank space to illustrate hackers’ attacks on companies that had pulled funding to WikiLeaks and another with a large, passport-stamped banana to illustrate a story on the international ties of food products. It was his second consecutive win in the category.

Business: Brenda Bouw, Boyd Erman, Andy Hoffman, Jacquie McNish and Eric Reguly

The paper’s in-depth reporting of BHP Billiton’s failed takeover bid for Potash Corp., uncovered mistakes made by the Australian mining giant and also showed how companies in previous takeovers had ignored commitments to their targets after closing the deal.

Editorial Cartooning: Brian Gable

Mr. Gable took home his sixth NNA for drawings on subjects as diverse as American politics and the rise of a tech-savvy generation with little knowledge of books. In one memorable take on the role-reversal of Toronto and Calgary’s mayoral races, he depicted a boat-load of elite Easterners fleeing Rob Ford country for the sanctuary of the Naheed Nenshi-run Alberta city.

International Reporting: Geoffrey York

To put human faces on the problem of maternal deaths, Africa correspondent Geoffrey York described the inside of a back-alley abortion clinic in Tanzania and the long journey of an Ethiopian woman trying to find medical attention during a difficult birth. Mr. York won the same category last year.

Globe writers were also runners-up in several categories.

Ingrid Peritz earned a nod for a piece on a heart-shaped booklet created by women in the Auschwitz concentration camp; Jacquie McNish and Janet McFarland were nominated for a series on women’s equity in the workplace; Tara Perkins and Grant Robertson for reporting on the insurance industry’s use of perks; André Picard for columns on medical topics; Ian Brown for a profile of the brother of gold-medal skier Alexandre Bilodeau; and the team of Greg McArthur, Timothy Appleby, Steve Ladurantaye and Christie Blatchford for their coverage of the Russell Williams case.

Editor's note: The original newspaper version of this article and an earlier version incorrectly said The Globe and Mail also won the multimedia award the previous year. The Globe and Mail won the inaugural award in 2008 This online version has been corrected.

Follow on Twitter: @adrianmorrow

 

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