Go to the Globe and Mail homepage

Jump to main navigationJump to main content

A few of the Canadian fans who were able to watch and celebrate a gold medal at Real Sports Bar in Toronto as Canada defeated the United States in women’s hockey at the Sochi Olympics on Feb. 20, 2014. (Kevin Van Paassen/The Globe and Mail)
A few of the Canadian fans who were able to watch and celebrate a gold medal at Real Sports Bar in Toronto as Canada defeated the United States in women’s hockey at the Sochi Olympics on Feb. 20, 2014. (Kevin Van Paassen/The Globe and Mail)

It was sudden death for workplace productivity as Canada won gold in women’s hockey Add to ...

Ontario Premier Kathleen Wynne was rushing between meetings in Toronto during the overtime period, but insisted on poking her head in the government caucus office to watch for a couple minutes, according to her office. By sheer luck, she happened to be there when the goal was scored and the room burst into cheers. She told staff she was “thrilled.”

“I was at my office at the School of Public Policy and Governance [at the University of Toronto], where everyone was glued to their livestreams,” former federal Liberal Party leader Bob Rae said in an e-mail. “Simultaneous eruptions of joy everywhere. Great fun.”

“From what I can tell, the entire country shut down,” said former Ontario Progressive Conservative leader John Tory, who is now an afternoon talk-show host on Toronto radio station CFRB and is considering a run for the city’s mayoralty.

He was driving to work listening to the game on the radio when the team was down by two goals. Later, in the radio station, he could hear others erupting as the women scored their comeback goals.

“I almost fell over when in about the first minute of OT we had a close call,” he said. When they won he was preparing for his show, but the rest of the radio station sounded like a party, he said.

Tory wasn’t the only one who didn’t get to see the final seconds. Kellie Leitch, Canada’s Labour Minister and Minister for the Status of Women, was driving in her truck in the Toronto area while listening to the game on the radio.

“When [Brianne] Jenner scored [to cut the U.S. lead to 2-1], I was hopeful, because obviously they were reaching down deep,” Dr. Leitch said. When the game was tied, “we almost drove off the road,” she added.

“Today’s been a fabulous day for female Canadian athletes,” she said. “So many young women and girls in this country will be so inspired, and should be so proud of these Canadians.”

Linda Hasenfratz, chief executive officer of auto parts maker Linamar Corp., watched the game with her daughter who is ill in hospital with pneumonia in Guelph, Ont.

“I am keeping her company so we have been filling the day watching the Olympics (while I prepare for quarter end at the same time),” Ms. Hasenfratz said in an e-mail. “I tried to tell Emily if she wasn’t sick we would not have had the chance to watch the game so a bit of a silver lining.”

Some lucky individuals got to be at the game in person.

“I watched the game live with many from the NHL, including management, other owners, and Gary Bettman,” George Gosbee, a co-owner of the Phoenix Coyotes, e-mailed from the after party in Sochi. “After Canada scored to tie it, everyone was standing and cheering. Not just because Canada scored, but because we were watching a great, passionate game.”

With reports from Oliver Moore, Jeff Gray, Greg Keenan, Boyd Erman, John Daly, Simon Houpt, Kelly Cryderman, Elizabeth Church, Adrian Morrow, Gloria Galloway, Tim Kiladze, Dave Parkinson, Sandra Martin, Josh Wingrove, Kim Mackreal, Kevin Carmichael, Jacqueline Nelson and Jane Taber

Single page

Follow us on Twitter: @globeandmail

Top stories

Most popular video »

Highlights

Most Popular Stories