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Ruth Goldbloom, who spearheaded efforts to establish Pier 21 in Halifax as a national museum in 2010, has died. She was 88. (Sandor Fizli for The Globe and Mail)
Ruth Goldbloom, who spearheaded efforts to establish Pier 21 in Halifax as a national museum in 2010, has died. She was 88. (Sandor Fizli for The Globe and Mail)

Mourners pay final respects to Halifax philanthropist Ruth Goldbloom Add to ...

Hundreds of people attended a funeral today for Ruth Goldbloom on Halifax’s waterfront, a short walk away from the immigration shed that she helped turn into a national museum. Ms. Goldbloom died Wednesday at the age of 88.

Born Ruth Schwartz in New Waterford, N.S., Ms. Goldbloom was a committed community leader and philanthropist who was known for her tireless work on behalf of several organizations.

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Bestowed with six honorary degrees, Ms. Goldbloom also served on several boards and was awarded the Order of Canada.

But it’s her work to establish Pier 21 as a national immigration museum that is likely her most lasting legacy.

Ms. Goldbloom was the driving force behind the campaign to turn what was a derelict shed on the waterfront into a lasting tribute to the one million immigrants who passed through its doors between 1928 and 1971.

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