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A cat , nicknamed Cinnamon by staff at the Lincoln County Humane Society in St. Catharine’s, Ont., recovers from surgery. The Southern Ontario animal shelter says she was shot multiple times by a crossbow, but the kittens she was carrying did not survive. (LINCOLN COUNTY HUMANE SOCIETY/THE CANADIAN PRESS)
A cat , nicknamed Cinnamon by staff at the Lincoln County Humane Society in St. Catharine’s, Ont., recovers from surgery. The Southern Ontario animal shelter says she was shot multiple times by a crossbow, but the kittens she was carrying did not survive. (LINCOLN COUNTY HUMANE SOCIETY/THE CANADIAN PRESS)

Ontario cat that survived crossbow shooting has new home at clinic Add to ...

A pregnant cat in southern Ontario who was shot multiple times with a crossbow has a new home: the animal clinic that saved her life.

The Lincoln County Humane Society, where Cinnamon the cat was recovering, says the clinic is the “obvious choice” for Cinnamon.

Kevin Strooband says staff at the St. Catharine’s Animal Hospital are “ecstatic” with the news.

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The animal hospital says Cinnamon underwent surgery after being shot in the abdomen at least four times on July 16.

Veterinarian Bassem Boctor has said staff fell in love with the feline immediately and were hoping to keep her.

Strooband says Cinnamon has now been handed over to the clinic since the cat couldn’t be matched with a new owner.

The humane society says Cinnamon was pregnant when she was shot, and that her six unborn kittens did not survive.

“We do not see cases like this often at all,” Strooband said last week. “I would say it’s pretty heinous. It’s calculated.”

Cinnamon is still recovering from surgery and a seizure she suffered on Monday, but is now doing much better, Stroodband said Wednesday.

Investigators are urging anyone with information about the case to contact the humane society.

Animal cruelty convictions under the Criminal Code carry either a maximum prison term of five years or a maximum fine of $10,000.

Charges laid under the Ontario SPCA Act can lead to a fine of up to $60,000 and up to two years in jail, as well as a lifetime ban on owning animals.

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