Go to the Globe and Mail homepage

Jump to main navigationJump to main content

Vendors are transported in the early morning hours to bananas farms in the countryside, in Port-au-Prince, Haiti, Friday, Dec. 7, 2012. The vendors hope to bring back and sell the bananas at the local markets. Haitians suffered widespread hunger following an unusually active storm season this year and are likely to experience more, according to a study released Friday, Dec. 7, 2012. Nearly 70 per cent of the more than 1,000 households interviewed said they experienced moderate or severe hunger, the study found. (Dieu Nalio Chery/AP)
Vendors are transported in the early morning hours to bananas farms in the countryside, in Port-au-Prince, Haiti, Friday, Dec. 7, 2012. The vendors hope to bring back and sell the bananas at the local markets. Haitians suffered widespread hunger following an unusually active storm season this year and are likely to experience more, according to a study released Friday, Dec. 7, 2012. Nearly 70 per cent of the more than 1,000 households interviewed said they experienced moderate or severe hunger, the study found. (Dieu Nalio Chery/AP)

Ottawa renews warning for travel to Haiti Add to ...

Foreign Affairs continues to caution Canadian travellers to Haiti after the United States toughened its travel warning for Americans heading to the Caribbean country.

Foreign Affairs does not have a similar countrywide advisory in place but on Saturday renewed its lesser warning that Canadians should exercise a “high degree of caution” in Haiti.

More Related to this Story

It says crime continues to put travellers at risk, particularly in some neighbourhoods in capital Port-au-Prince.

Foreign Affairs also says those attending National Carnival celebrations February in the northern city of Cap-Haitien should also be particularly vigilant about their safety.

The U.S. State Department issued an updated travel warning Friday stating that “no one is safe” from kidnapping and violent crime in the capital and highlighting the risks from robbery, lawlessness, infectious disease and poor medical facilities.

It says in recent months travellers arriving in Port-au-Prince on flights from the United States have been attacked and robbed after leaving the airport, while at least two U.S. citizens were killed in robbery and kidnapping incidents.

The new U.S. travel warning replaces a less severe advisory issued in June.

Follow us on Twitter: @globeandmail

In the know

Most popular video »

Highlights

More from The Globe and Mail

Most Popular Stories