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This 2006 photo made available by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention shows a female Aedes aegypti mosquito acquiring a blood meal from a human host at the Centers for Disease Control in Atlanta. Canadians should stay vigilant about fending off mosquitoes in the coming weeks, health officials said after an Ontario woman's death was linked to the West Nile virus. (James Gathany/Centers for Disease Control and Prevention/The Canadian Press/James Gathany/Centers for Disease Control and Prevention/The Canadian Press)
This 2006 photo made available by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention shows a female Aedes aegypti mosquito acquiring a blood meal from a human host at the Centers for Disease Control in Atlanta. Canadians should stay vigilant about fending off mosquitoes in the coming weeks, health officials said after an Ontario woman's death was linked to the West Nile virus. (James Gathany/Centers for Disease Control and Prevention/The Canadian Press/James Gathany/Centers for Disease Control and Prevention/The Canadian Press)

Person in Alberta dies from West Nile; first in province since 2007 Add to ...

A person has died from the West Nile virus in southern Alberta.

Alberta Health Services says it’s the first death related to the virus since 2007.

Ten cases of the infection have been reported in Alberta this year.

Alberta Health Services is not releasing any information about the person who died, nor will it say anything about the other nine cases.

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The government agency will only say that there were seven cases in the south zone, and one each in the Calgary, central and north zones.

Ontario has had four deaths attributed to West Nile this year.

Public Health Ontario says there have been 220 confirmed and probable cases in the province as of Sept. 25.

The Public Health Agency of Canada says that as of Sept. 29 there were 386 reported clinical cases of West Nile virus across the country. That was up from 102 cases in 2011.

Mosquito bites can result in two different forms of West Nile infection: non-neurological syndrome and the potentially fatal neurological syndrome. The latter can cause tremors, drowsiness, confusion, difficulty swallowing, high fever, unconsciousness and paralysis.

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