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Rosalina Demcheson, Grace Salomonie ,Maxwell Cousins, Zachery Carpenter, Kiara Janes, Asini Wijesooriya and Joy Nowdluk wrote to The Globe about what life is like in Iqaluit. (SCOTT WRIGHT FOR THE GLOBE AND MAIL)
Rosalina Demcheson, Grace Salomonie ,Maxwell Cousins, Zachery Carpenter, Kiara Janes, Asini Wijesooriya and Joy Nowdluk wrote to The Globe about what life is like in Iqaluit. (SCOTT WRIGHT FOR THE GLOBE AND MAIL)

THE NORTH

Nunavut’s next generation: The kids’ view on life in Iqaluit Add to ...

GRACE SALOMONIE (12), GRADE 7

In the Arctic, there are animals we hunt, eat and wear as traditional clothing. Inuit have been living like this for thousands of years. But what happens when a part of the wildlife is taken away?

People in the North are being forced to pay the price for the southern people’s pollution. Global warming will affect the land and animals, which will have major impacts on Inuit culture.

Wildlife was once the only thing Inuit lived off. Inuit used to follow wherever caribou migrated. Inuit have been hunting for thousands of years. Some people hunt for food, others hunt for game. The hunting rate is rising, meaning that more animals are being killed.

The polar bear population is low because of hunting and global warming. There are about 20,000 to 25,000 in the global polar bear population. In 2005, the polar bear population was upgraded from least-concerned to vulnerable by the IUCN Polar Bear Specialist group.

The younger generation here litter because they don’t know the importance of the land and what it was to the elders when they were growing up. Hunters bring food when they go out and do not leave their garbage on the land, yet some do and this causes an even greater problem because some animals will eat that garbage. This unfortunate animal will become ill and, in worst cases, die from the garbage.

Caribou is a common animal that we hunt for. Many people hunt for it. The more people that hunt for it, the less the population in caribou. If the caribou go extinct, the food chain of the North will be broken. This will be life-threatening to most carnivorous and herbivorous animals up here and it will gradually affect other food chains negatively. Hunting too much and polluting have devastating consequences to the land and people, so we should show restraint.

MAXWELL COUSINS (12), GRADE 7

There are a lot of concerns facing Nunavut and the people who call it home. One of the biggest concerns that I see on a daily basis involves education. Being in middle school and having classmates that don’t attend, it’s rather obvious that there’s a lack of care shown to the schools and the people who put a lot of work into them. There are a lot of people who aren’t able to be successful and have good jobs because they didn’t care about their education as a child. While a portion of it can be considered the child’s fault, seeing as ultimately they have to make the final choice on whether or not they care about their education, the parents of these children can take the blame as well. If the parents of these children don’t care enough about their offspring’s education to just make sure that they get on the bus, then how much do they really care?

When it comes down to the schools and those who help run them, it’s not bad at all. Through hard work and dedication, anyone who tries can go from kindergarten here to postsecondary education anywhere else. This has happened in the past, and it seems that it can only get better with more students following through and going on to colleges and universities. If more effort were put into school by the students, they would be able to realize their dreams and perhaps represent Nunavut and themselves in a positive way in the future.

The education system here isn’t perfect, and I doubt it ever will be. But with a little more effort and dedication, it can be what we all need it to be.

ZACHERY CARPENTER (11), GRADE 6

I have lived in Iqaluit all my life. I know there are issues in Nunavut. However, my life has been good, and I believe there are more good things about living in Nunavut than bad.

One problem in Nunavut is the number of people who smoke cigarettes. Smoking makes people unhealthy and causes sickness. A lot of adults smoke, but a lot of kids in Nunavut smoke as well. Smoking also causes people to have less money because cigarettes cost a lot in Nunavut.

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