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Saskatchewan farmer Larry Spratt's farm near Melfort. Spratt and his father Don expanded their farm in a modern version of crop sharing where they farm land bought by investors. (David Stobbe for The Globe and Mail)
Saskatchewan farmer Larry Spratt's farm near Melfort. Spratt and his father Don expanded their farm in a modern version of crop sharing where they farm land bought by investors. (David Stobbe for The Globe and Mail)

Earlier discussion

Why corporate Canada is very interested in buying the farm Add to ...

Saskatchewan has some of the richest and least expensive farmland in the world, and there's a gigantic pool of global money that would like to buy up as much of it as they can, and then lease it back to the farmers to operate. In the next few years one of the hottest debates in agriculture will be about how much land these funds will be able to buy, and what happens once farming decisions are made in the boardroom.

More related to this story

On Wednesday from noon to 1 p.m. ET we hosted a live discussion on this issue with Tom Eisenhauer, President, Bonnefield Financial Inc. Click on the box below for a replay of that chat.

Reading this on smart phone? You can view a mobile friendly version of the live chat here.





 




Mr. Eisenhauer has over twenty-three years of finance experience in a broad range of private equity investing, investment banking and merchant banking activities. Mr. Eisenhauer holds a B.A. (Gold Medal) in Economics and Russian Literature, Dalhousie University, an M.A. Economics from Queen's University and is a graduate of the SME Board Effectiveness Program, Institute of Corporate Directors and the Rotman School of Management.

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