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While a large turbine can generate energy for 5,000 homes, smaller windmills provide energy for a single household or farm, like this one in Isle of Luing, Scotland. (Handout/Handout)
While a large turbine can generate energy for 5,000 homes, smaller windmills provide energy for a single household or farm, like this one in Isle of Luing, Scotland. (Handout/Handout)

Earlier discussion

The future for wind power in Canada Add to ...

One of Canada’s most successful small-wind companies has carved out its niche with relatively old technology. Jonathan Barry, president of Seaforth Energy Inc. in Dartmouth, N.S., said his company’s AOC 15/50 turbine, developed in the early 1990s, is successful because it is proven technology. It has been installed all around the world, and its performance and characteristics are well known.

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Mr. Barry said Canada’s disproportionate strength in small wind is remarkable given that there is little government support for the sector.

Mr. Barry answered readers' questions about his business and wind power in Canada during a live discussion Wednesday.

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