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The Titanic Bow from the starboard side is shown in these handout photos taken Saturday Aug. 28, 2010. Cutting-edge and 3D technology have helped to produce this picture -- the clearest to date. (Premier Exhibitions Inc - Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution/The Canadian Press)
The Titanic Bow from the starboard side is shown in these handout photos taken Saturday Aug. 28, 2010. Cutting-edge and 3D technology have helped to produce this picture -- the clearest to date. (Premier Exhibitions Inc - Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution/The Canadian Press)

Titanic expedition provides first wreck images in five years Add to ...



An expedition that surveying the wreck of the Titanic is showing off some crisp images of the doomed ocean liner.

It has used a pair of robots to take thousands of photographs and hours of video of the wreck, which lies roughly four kilometres below the surface.

The hi-resolution images include shots of the ship bow, clearing showing the railing and anchors.

An expedition spokesman says they're the first images of the ship taken in over five years.





Rusticle growth on the starboard (right) side of the Titanic bow, including one of the anchors and covering portholes is shown in these handout photos taken Saturday Aug. 28, 2010. One of the expedition's missions is to determine the rate of rusticle growth and its role in ship deterioration.



The expedition left St. John's, NL, earlier this month to the spot in the Atlantic where the ship struck an iceberg in 1912 and sank.

A total of 1,522 passengers and crew perished in the disaster, which has generated a cult-like following in the decades since.

Members of the expedition have described the robots being used as the "the great-great-grandchildren" of the equipment that first explored the Titanic in 1985.

They're being used to explore the entire debris field around the wreck, up to half of which has never been examined.





A birds-eye view of the Titanic bow is shown in these handout photos taken Saturday Aug. 28, 2010. Once feared to be in danger of collapse, this photo shows that the bow is in good condition.

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