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Col. Russell Williams is shown in this court-released image from his interrrogation by police captured on video and shown Wednesday in a Belleville, Ont. courtroom. Williams told police that while he did ask himself why he raped and killed women he could never come up with an answer and he was “pretty sure the answers don't matter.” (The Canadian Press)
Col. Russell Williams is shown in this court-released image from his interrrogation by police captured on video and shown Wednesday in a Belleville, Ont. courtroom. Williams told police that while he did ask himself why he raped and killed women he could never come up with an answer and he was “pretty sure the answers don't matter.” (The Canadian Press)

Day 3

Victims describe emotional scars from Col. Williams's crimes Add to ...

In the video of his voluntary interview shown in court earlier Wednesday, Col. Williams batted away questions about his secret life of stalking and murdering women for the first few hours.

But his will finally waned after he was told that police were on the verge of executing a search warrant on his house and discovering photographic evidence of his crimes.

His confession then poured out as he matter-of-factly answered questions in gruesome detail.

Initially, the former base commander and rising military star appeared relaxed and confident, declining Detective Sergeant Jim Smyth's offer of a lawyer.

Asked what he was doing the day after Ms. Lloyd went missing, Col. Williams paused: "I was at home with a stomach flu." In fact, he spent the day assaulting, raping and then murdering her.

The police officer asked how Col. Williams knew Cpl. Comeau, his first murder victim. The pilot said he had met her once on a military flight. The 37-year-old worked as a flight attendant.

Col. Williams agreed to provide an impression of his boot tread, the same boots he wore the night he abducted Ms. Lloyd, as well as a blood sample. "Can I assume you will be discreet?" he asks the officer about his DNA sample. "It's tough to undo the rumour mill once it gets started."

The colonel's nonchalant manner began to slip and his answers got shorter when he was asked whether he knew Ms. Lloyd or had ever been in the home of a neighbour he sexually assaulted.

Told that police found a tire track in the field next to Ms. Lloyd's house that was the same brand as the tires on his Pathfinder SUV, Col. Williams expressed disbelief, saying: "Really?" Det. Sgt. Smyth also showed the colonel that his boot print is identical to one found in the field.

"You and I both know you were at Jessica Lloyd's house and I need to know why," the police officer says. After a long pause, Col. Williams replied: "I don't know what to say."

Col. Williams, who was told that his house was being searched and that his wife was aware, became silent. Det. Sgt. Smyth asked Col. Williams to do the right thing and admit his guilt, if only to give some closure to Ms. Lloyd's parents. He sat quietly, staring at his interrogator.

A bit later, Col. Williams expressed concerns about his wife and the impact this will have on the Canadian Forces. He also thought of his home, saying: "I'm worried they're tearing up my wife's new house."

"I want to minimize the impact on my wife... so how do we do that?" he said. Det. Sgt. Smyth responded: "Well, we can start by telling the truth."

Col. Williams offered to show the location of Ms. Lloyd's body on a map. Sniffling and choked up, he pointed to the approximate location and told Det. Sgt. Smyth that she was alive for almost 24 hours. Sitting in the prisoner's box, Col. Williams cried as the video was played in court.

Col. Williams described how he broke into Ms. Lloyd's home, hit her, covered her eyes with tape, bound her with rope, sexually assaulted her and then took her to his cottage in Tweed. He later says it "wasn't always the plan" to take her there.

After making Ms. Lloyd shower, he said they both slept, Ms. Lloyd still bound. Upon waking, she experienced convulsions, which she told him she had had before, likely from stress. "She had a seizure. She felt it coming on. She had some before. It lasted quite a while."

Col. Williams led Ms. Lloyd to believe that he would release her. "Before I let her go, I told her I want to take some pictures of her in her underwear and have sex with her."

As they were walking, he said: "She thought we were leaving. I hit her in the back of the head" with a flashlight and then strangled her, he said. "You'll find signs of it," he said, explaining that there is blood in his cottage.

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