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Nicole Ryan, the Nova Scotia woman who tried to hire a hit man to kill her abusive husband, attends a news conference at her lawyer's office in Halifax on Thursday, Jan.17, 2013. Ryan is free after the Supreme Court of Canada ordered an extraordinary stay of proceedings. (Andrew Vaughan/The Canadian Press)
Nicole Ryan, the Nova Scotia woman who tried to hire a hit man to kill her abusive husband, attends a news conference at her lawyer's office in Halifax on Thursday, Jan.17, 2013. Ryan is free after the Supreme Court of Canada ordered an extraordinary stay of proceedings. (Andrew Vaughan/The Canadian Press)

Watchdog clears RCMP in murder for hire case; questions wife’s credibility Add to ...

That February, a principal at the school Ms. Ryan taught at called police after seeing her husband in the parking lot trying to retrieve a car the couple owned. No charges followed from this incident, but it did lead the wife to later complain that the Mounties were protecting her husband because he was a Canadian Forces soldier.

Yet “none of the available information supports a determination that the RCMP afforded special treatment to Mr. Ryan as a result of his standing as a member of the military,” reads the watchdog agency report.

In digging through records, the watchdog agency found no criminal history for the husband. But Mr. McPhail writes the wife, Ms. Ryan, had faced allegations of a crime in the past -- she was once accused “of attempting to run her sister over with her car,” the report says.

The watchdog agency’s report says that investigators pressed Ms. Ryan following her court appearances on why she had never told police that her husband physically assaulted her or threatened her with guns. While she made these allegations in court, she had not made them to police directly.

“I don’t have proof, and I know you need proof. Without proof, they can’t do anything,” she replied, according to the watchdog agency’s report. “So what is the point of even saying anything?”

After Ms. Ryan was arrested for hiring a hit man, she argued in an interview with investigators that she should have gotten counselling instead of being targeted by a police sting operation.

“If they found out that I was conspiring to commit murder, why didn’t anybody come down and say ‘Nicole you’ve got to sit down. … Ma’am maybe you should see a psychologist?’” she said, according to the report. “… SO they knew there was something psychologically wrong with me…”

Given the circumstances, Mr. McPhail writes in his report, Ms. Ryan’s expectations of police were “in almost every respect, unrealistic.”

"None of the RCMP records supports a conclusion that information was either apparent on its face or conveyed to the RCMP such that members could determine that Ms. Doucet was being abused by her husband," he writes. “Each RCMP member interviewed is adamant that he or she repeatedly asked Ms. Doucet probing questions and attempted to determine the basis of her fears to no avail."

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