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Vehicles stop at customs booths while entering the United States from the tunnel coming under the Detroit river from Windsor, Ontario in downtown Detroit, Michigan March 1, 2013. (REBECCA COOK/REUTERS)
Vehicles stop at customs booths while entering the United States from the tunnel coming under the Detroit river from Windsor, Ontario in downtown Detroit, Michigan March 1, 2013. (REBECCA COOK/REUTERS)

Windsor seeks clarity on what will happen to Detroit section of tunnel linking the two cities Add to ...

In the wake of Detroit’s bankruptcy, the mayor of Windsor says his office is reaching out to the city to see what is happening with the U.S. portion of the Windsor-Detroit Tunnel.

Eddie Francis says his office has contacted the office of Detroit’s emergency manager.

It’s not clear yet if Detroit’s portion of the tunnel is one of the city’s assets that would be put up for sale.

Though the bankruptcy had been feared for months, when Detroit filed for Chapter 9 on Thursday it became the largest U.S. city in history to do so.

While Francis believes Detroit’s bankruptcy won’t impact other relationships between the two communities, he says one of the key questions is what happens to the U.S. section of tunnel.

Currently that portion is owned by the City of Detroit but it’s leased to a private corporation for the next seven years.

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