Go to the Globe and Mail homepage

Jump to main navigationJump to main content

AdChoices

Elections

Election 2015

News and analysis from Canada's federal election campaign

Quebec Premier Jean Charest speaks at a rally in his riding of Sherbrooke, on July 31, 2012. (Christinne Muschi/REUTERS)
Quebec Premier Jean Charest speaks at a rally in his riding of Sherbrooke, on July 31, 2012. (Christinne Muschi/REUTERS)

Charest is his own broken record, or is it cassette tape? Add to ...

Jean Charest accuses Pauline Marois of always saying the same things about allegations of corruption in the Quebec Liberal government.

Whenever Mr. Charest is asked to respond to the Parti Québécois Leader’s attacks, he answers that she is sounding like a broken record or, as he likes to say in French and English, a cassette tape..

“My adversaries are always playing the same cassette tape. Let’s call it a cassette tape because they will play it often given that Ms. Mrois has nothing to say on the economy,” Mr. Charest said. “We know it, we’ll frequently hear that cassette tape.”

In fact, one could say that Mr. Charest’s uses his line about the “cassette tape” so often that he is also starting to sound like a tape deck. It probably takes one to know one.

Report Typo/Error

Follow on Twitter: @danlebla

In the know

The Globe Recommends

loading

Most popular videos »

Highlights

More from The Globe and Mail

Most popular