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Signage outside the CIDA building in Gatineau, Quebec has already been changed to reflect the new department -- the Department of Foreign Affairs, Trade and Development— at 200 Portage in Gatineau, Quebec, Thursday June 27, 2013. The federal government says it is aware of reports that a Canadian has been killed in Iraq. t the Foreign Affairs Department isn’t confirming it is Farah Mohamed Shirdon, a former Calgary resident the CBC has identified as having been radicalized in Canada and gone to the Middle East to fight for Islamic State of Iraq and Syria. (Fred Chartrand/The Canadian Press)
Signage outside the CIDA building in Gatineau, Quebec has already been changed to reflect the new department -- the Department of Foreign Affairs, Trade and Development— at 200 Portage in Gatineau, Quebec, Thursday June 27, 2013. The federal government says it is aware of reports that a Canadian has been killed in Iraq. t the Foreign Affairs Department isn’t confirming it is Farah Mohamed Shirdon, a former Calgary resident the CBC has identified as having been radicalized in Canada and gone to the Middle East to fight for Islamic State of Iraq and Syria. (Fred Chartrand/The Canadian Press)

Ex-Calgary resident reported to have died fighting in Iraq Add to ...

The federal government says it is aware of reports that a Canadian has been killed in Iraq.

But the Foreign Affairs Department isn’t confirming it is Farah Mohamed Shirdon, a former Calgary resident the CBC has identified as having been radicalized in Canada and gone to the Middle East to fight for Islamic State of Iraq and Syria.

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The CBC cited multiple social media reports out of Iraq saying Mr. Shirdon has been killed.

Earlier this year, the network aired a propaganda video of Mr. Shirdon burning his Canadian passport and threatening U.S. President Barack Obama.

Foreign Affairs says it is monitoring the situation closely.

The department is advising against all non-essential travel to Iraq because of the “dangerous and unpredictable security situation” in the country.

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