The Globe and Mail

Go to the Globe and Mail homepage

Jump to main navigationJump to main content

AdChoices

Entry archive:

Vocal in opposition, Liberals turn quiet on fate of jailed Saudi blogger

CAMPBELL CLARK

Less than a year ago, Liberal MP Marc Garneau stood up in the Commons to demand prime minister Stephen Harper personally contact the King of Saudi Arabia to seek the release of blogger Raif Badawi, a man sentenced to 10 years in jail and 1,000 lashes for suggesting a few modest reformist ideas.

On Wednesday, Justin Trudeau’s Liberals will mark six months in power, but their zeal for prime ministerial intervention has markedly declined. Mr. Trudeau hasn’t stepped into the case. Instead, the Liberals have decided it’s better to keep their diplomacy relatively quiet, and go slowly.

More »

Conservative Party digs a deeper basement

Nik Nanos

Nik Nanos is The Globe and Mail’s pollster and chairman of Nanos Research.

Since their defeat in the last federal election at the hands of the Trudeau Liberals, the Conservatives have been consoled by the view that their “basement” in popular support was a robust 32 per cent. New research conducted by Nanos suggests that the basement is noticeably lower now.

More »

Oft-forgotten Indiana now crucial testing ground in U.S. election

DAVID SHRIBMAN

David Shribman, executive editor of the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette, won a Pulitzer Prize for coverage of U.S. politics.

The stridently right-wing John Birch Society was born there and the Ku Klux Klan flourished there. Its state university has one of the most distinguished classical-music programs in the United States and its capital city has one of the country’s most beloved Jewish delicatessens. Its politics are so ferocious – so competitive – that nearly three decades ago the lower house was divided precisely equally between the two parties and thus the leadership alternated between two men. They were called the stereo Speakers.

More »

Trudeau waiting for Bombardier’s controlling owners to blink

CAMPBELL CLARK

For months, Justin Trudeau’s government has been locked in a staring contest with Bombardier Inc. Now the Liberals have a little more time to wait for the company’s controlling family to blink.

Bombardier, the Montreal-based planes-and-trains maker, wants $1-billion in public money. But the government doesn’t like the idea that the Beaudoin-Bombardier family will keep the majority control that it retains through multi-vote shares.

More »

Why a carbon tax is better than cap-and-trade

JEFFREY SIMPSON

Finally, after years of delay, Canada seems ready to place a price on carbon that contributes to global warming.

Holdouts remain, as in Saskatchewan Premier Brad Wall. There are still pockets of resistance on the right in the media and politically, although Ontario Progressive Conservative Leader Patrick Brown recently endorsed a carbon tax.

More »

Italy is making strides on its long road back

JEFFREY SIMPSON

No penalty exists for political imitators, so when an Italian cabinet minister declares that “Italy is back,” the Trudeau government lacks any claim for copyright infringement.

Back from what, we might ask of today’s Italy. Back a little from a long period of very slow growth, bordering on recession. Back from unemployment of 12.8 per cent, but still at 11.5 per cent. Back definitely from swinging-door governments – 63 of them in 70 years – to the current one of stability and reasonable popularity, led by Italy’s version of Justin Trudeau, centre-left Prime Minister Matteo Renzi.

More »

Three lessons to draw from the Saudi arms deal controversy

COLIN ROBERTSON

A former diplomat, Colin Robertson is vice-president and fellow with the Canadian Global Affairs Institute, and senior adviser, Dentons LLP.

All arms sales are controversial, but when the buyer is a country with a human-rights record like Saudi Arabia’s and the deal is worth billions, the public scrutiny rightfully reaches a new level.

More »

Primary wins put Trump, Clinton tantalizingly close to victory

David Shribman

David Shribman, executive editor of the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette, won a Pulitzer Prize for coverage of U.S. politics.

They haven’t reached the finish line yet but Hillary Rodham Clinton and Donald J. Trump can see it from here.

It is visible beyond the Ohio River on the western shoulder of Pennsylvania and is coming into focus on the Susquehanna on the state’s eastern shoulder. It can be seen from the farmlands of the state’s agricultural interior and from the peaks of its rocky ridges and soaring peaks, if not from its anthracite coal mines.

More »

Will Obama’s stance help Britain to think clearly about the EU?

JEFFREY SIMPSON

It was always evident that successive U.S. administrations opposed Quebec secession. Every serious U.S. foreign-policy analyst who thought about the matter – and few did, it should be said – concluded that a united Canada best served American interests.

American presidents tended to walk a bit on eggs when addressing the Quebec issue, in case they were seen as excessively interfering in a Canadian decision. The most decisive pro-federalism statement came from president Bill Clinton at a conference at Mont-Tremblant in October, 1999. Then-Parti Québécois premier Lucien Bouchard attended but was reduced to spluttering, so passionately and persuasively had Mr. Clinton defended federalist principles. The president (who had thrown away his State Department speech) never mentioned Quebec, but everyone in the hall got the message.

More »

Nik Nanos: What Trudeau needs to learn from Harper and the Duffy trial

Nik Nanos

Nik Nanos is The Globe and Mail’s pollster and chairman of Nanos Research.

The Duffy trial was not only a verdict on the lack of criminality of the charges levied against Senator Duffy, it’s a lesson for all of Canada’s political parties.

In today’s turbocharged social-media political frenzy, the fast and furious response might make some feel good but it carries risks. This is especially true for any government and was the trap the Conservatives fell into.

More »

Pennsylvania is a political jigsaw puzzle

DAVID SHRIBMAN

David Shribman, executive editor of the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette, won a Pulitzer Prize for coverage of U.S. politics.

Tuesday’s confrontation in the fight for the White House has been played out in a state so broad, so fractured and so lacking in political unity that the five candidates vying for their parties’ presidential nominations in the Pennsylvania primary might be forgiven for thinking they have been competing in several different places at once.

More »

Trudeau responsible for halting runaway Senate gravy train

CAMPBELL CLARK

Senator Mike Duffy’s expense scandal is now Justin Trudeau’s problem.

Not in the literal sense, of course. Mr. Duffy, acquitted last Thursday, is free to take his seat in the Senate and move on. But the unfinished business of reining in senators’ opportunities to use public money loosely, to stop the unseemly practices that drive Canadians crazy – that’s on Mr. Trudeau now.

More »

Liberals hire tech entrepreneur for senior role shaping policy

Simon Doyle

Innovation Minister Navdeep Bains has hired tech entrepreneur Nathon Gunn as his top innovation adviser as the minister’s office develops a broad strategy to help industries confront rapid technological change in all sectors, from renewable energy to manufacturing.

The co-founder of startups Bitcasters Inc., Social Game Universe and LightningPlatform.com will be playing a senior advisory role in the Liberal government’s aim to create jobs by helping companies innovate amid technological disruption and a shifting global economy. The Liberal budget plan said the government wanted to “redesign and redefine how it supports innovation and growth.”

More »

Duffy's acquittal the ultimate payback on Harper's PMO

CAMPBELL CLARK

‘Wait,” Mike Duffy said in his last speech in the Senate, back in 2013, when he claimed Stephen Harper’s PMO had railroaded him. “There is even more.”

He wasn’t kidding. On Thursday, Justice Charles Vaillancourt acquitted Senator Duffy on all 31 charges of bribery, fraud, and breach of trust. And in a sense, he convicted Mr. Harper’s PMO.

More »

Trudeau’s new era of transparency off to an iffy start

CAMPBELL CLARK

So much for that new era of ethics and transparency. This week, Justin Trudeau’s Liberals have fended off criticism of a dubious fundraiser with old-time, politics-as-usual tactics.

They used the clichéd methods of political wagon-circling: pointing to the other parties’ past transgressions, taking offence at the ethical critique, pointing to an authority who supposedly cleared the transgressor, general obfuscation and plain old time-wasting.

More »

Fixing health care in prisons will save us all money

André Picard

There are a lot of people in Canada’s jails and prisons, and many are among the unhealthiest in society.

There are about 140,000 criminal offenders under supervision at any given time, including 25,000 incarcerated in provincial and territorial jails and another 15,000 in federal penitentiaries.

Consider that, among men sentenced to federal penitentiary (meaning sentences of two years or more):

More »

Trump’s victory leads Republicans into uncharted waters

David Shribman

David Shribman, executive editor of the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette, won a Pulitzer Prize for coverage of U.S. politics.

With Donald Trump notching another triumph and the campaign turning to Pennsylvania and four other eastern states, the Republicans are heading into uncharted waters and are facing unruly winds and the prospect of a high-pressure area moving across the continent.

More »

Church had moral duty to residential-school survivors, but walked away

CAMPBELL CLARK

Bernard Valcourt, the former Conservative aboriginal affairs minister, found it frustrating that the Catholic Church wasn’t living up to its commitments to residential-school survivors. And he felt the government was hard-pressed to do anything about it: If you wanted a guarantee the church would pony up the whole sum, why make a $25-million payment dependent on a fundraising campaign?

More »

N.Y. primary's fierce contests signal shift in campaign geography, language

DAVID SHRIBMAN

David Shribman, executive editor of the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette, won a Pulitzer Prize for coverage of U.S. politics.

Like all the stops on the campaign trail, Tuesday’s New York primary is an important moment in the race for the White House. But as voters from Long Island in the southeastern part of the state all the way to Buffalo near the northwestern corner prepare to cast their ballots, it is becoming increasingly clear that both the geography and the vocabulary of the U.S. presidential campaign are changing dramatically.

More »

What the Catholic Church has shamefully demonstrated yet again

JOHN IBBITSON

As the Catholic Church has shamefully demonstrated yet again, the one word no one uses when confronting indigenous issues is “responsibility.”

Responsibility is something the courts may or may not impose. Outside the courtroom, you rarely hear the word mentioned in the vestry or the deputy minister’s office or at the band council meeting or in homes on or off reserve, unless “someone else’s” precedes it.

More »

Video »

For Subscribers

Contributors

Most Popular