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A rebellion in U.S. politics: After New Hampshire, the rethinking begins

David Shribman

The twin victories of the outsiders Donald J. Trump and Bernie Sanders in the New Hampshire primary mark the end of the beginning of a long American presidential campaign that – without ceremony, without pause – now hurries on to a new furious phase, with new struggles and new stakes.

That was evident as the candidates hastily departed frosty New Hampshire, decamped for Sunbelt confrontations, and already – almost seamlessly – began the process of rethinking and recalibrating their profiles and their appeals for the twin nomination fights that will not soon be decided.

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There’s a good reason against bombing IS – if only Trudeau would express it

JEFFREY SIMPSON

Asked repeatedly at a press conference to explain why Canada was withdrawing from the bombing campaign against the Islamic State in Iraq, Prime Minister Justin Trudeau could not provide an answer. At least not a clear one.

At one point, he even said, “There is no question there is a role for bombing, especially in the short term.” Mostly, the Prime Minister offered the mantra that Canada was better equipped to do other things, as in training Iraqi and Kurdish forces and providing more humanitarian assistance.

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In New Hampshire, young people aim to rock the vote

Joanna Slater

Early on Tuesday morning, fresh from voting in the New Hampshire primary, Skylar Charland and Meryssa Sweeney explained how for them, the final choice came down to Bernie Sanders or Donald Trump.

“I like Bernie’s theory, but it’s going to be taxpayers like me who pay for it,” said Ms. Sweeney, 23, standing outside a diner on a cold, sunny day in Manchester. Ms. Charland, 24, concurred. She liked Mr. Sanders’s promises, but felt that his policies wouldn’t reward hard-working people.

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Trudeau taps press gallery chief to run media logistics

LAURA STONE

The Prime Minister’s Office has poached the long-time chief of the Parliamentary Press Gallery to run media logistics for the new Liberal government.

Terry Guillon, the de facto administrative head of the gallery who worked as a liaison between Parliament Hill and journalists for 37 years, told The Globe and Mail he will join Justin Trudeau’s office after he leaves his current post on Feb. 19.

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Canada’s revised IS mission gets Trudeau out of political jam

CAMPBELL CLARK

More. Increased. Tripled. These are the key words the Liberal government wants you to remember about its revamped military mission against the Islamic State. Not that CF-18 fighter jets are coming out, but that more forces are going in.

That’s the political bargain Prime Minister Justin Trudeau had to make to finally get himself past the reflexive opposition he expressed, long before he became Prime Minister, to Canada’s part in the bombing mission. To stop the complaints about doing less, you have to do more.

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Nik Nanos: Saudi deal shows limits to what Canadians will do for jobs

Nik Nanos

Nik Nanos is The Globe and Mail’s pollster and chairman of Nanos Research. Follow him on Twitter at @niknanos.

Canadians want good jobs and to live by the values we cherish, such as equality and mutual respect. Why not? What’s wrong with wanting our cake and eating it too?

Contradictory forces often bump up against each other when you look at public opinion research. Ask Canadians and on the one hand they support taxes being reduced and at the same time oppose cuts to government programs that are funded by those taxes. Some may call this paradox of what we want and what we need.

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Trump’s (last?) chance: What to expect in New Hampshire

DAVID SHRIBMAN

David Shribman is executive editor of the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette and a winner of the Pulitzer Prize for coverage of U.S. politics.

And so one day of campaigning remains before the New Hampshire primary, the rustic political festival where candidates appear in tiny tucked-away villages for months and then engage in a furious February week of mass voter appeals and media advertising blasts. This ritual is a century old this year, and this battle has lived up to both the folklore and expectations of the Granite State. From the highest peaks of the White Mountains to the heady software startups of the cities to the sea-level towns of the state’s beach enclaves, this has been a raucous affair.

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Canada’s energy future is a long way from green

JEFFREY SIMPSON

Nobody, well, almost nobody, wants to hear the following news. Certainly not the Trudeau government.

The news comes from the National Energy Board that looked ahead to Canada’s energy demand and supply from now until 2040. The report is dry and factual, as is appropriate for a federal agency in these times of heavy-duty rhetorical debate around energy and the environment. Ready?

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Canada must be ready for a post-Obama America

JEFFREY SIMPSON

President Barack Obama will be playing host to a state dinner March 10 for Prime Minister Justin Trudeau. The event will receive mountains of media coverage in Canada that will stand in reverse relationship to the event’s importance.

Mr. Obama is already a lame-duck president, and getting lamer every day. Yes, of course, he is still president, but every president’s capacity to get things done at home weakens in the final year. Moreover, such is the impasse in Congress that Mr. Obama can forget about achieving anything of legislative importance.

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Trudeau-Notley alliance built on plan to square climate concerns with oil

CAMPBELL CLARK

It is Confederation upside down: A Liberal Prime Minister went to Alberta to meet the Premier as an ally. Make no mistake: Justin Trudeau and Rachel Notley need each other. And both of them, left-leaning politicians promising historic action on climate change, need oil to flow.

This was a Trudeau visiting Alberta not in magnanimous boom times, but during a worried, cranky bust.

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What Jean Chrétien thinks of Justin Trudeau and Hillary Clinton

Jane Taber

Jean Chrétien is not dispensing any advice to Justin Trudeau except to say, “Do your best.” He sees similarities between Hillary Clinton and Stéphane Dion – both are very cerebral and serious, he says – and he is proud of the law he passed banning corporations and unions from making political donations.

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What Iowa can and can’t tell us

JEFFREY SIMPSON

Most of the time, Americans call Iowa “flyover country,” a state to look down upon from an airplane. It’s not a place to go unless you have to, which is what wannabe presidential candidates do every four years.

There, they find politically engaged citizens, who, by virtue of that very passionate engagement and their own particularities, are massively unrepresentative of the U.S. electorate as a whole.

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Nik Nanos: Trudeau must learn this economic lesson from his father

Nik Nanos

Nik Nanos is The Globe and Mail’s pollster and chairman of Nanos Research. Follow him on Twitter at @niknanos

The distance from political phenomenon to fighting for survival can sometimes be surprisingly short. It was Pierre Elliott Trudeau who swept the nation in his first election and then fought for his political survival in his second election. The challenge in his first mandate was to navigate a topsy-turvy Canadian economy with rampant inflation and hammered by the rising price of oil. Uncertain economic times can be a roller-coaster ride of hope and anxiety for voters. Hope that things can be better and anxiety about job security. This also makes for political turbulence for governments.

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Trudeau adviser Mathieu Bouchard more than just PMO’s ‘Quebec guy’

DANIEL LEBLANC

As he staffed the Prime Minister’s Office, Justin Trudeau surrounded himself with Day 1 supporters and Liberal lifers – as well as Mathieu Bouchard.

The Montreal lawyer is one of the top officials in Mr. Trudeau’s inner circle, yet he wasn’t a member of the Liberal Party of Canada during the 2013 leadership race. Mr. Bouchard carried a free “supporter” card that gave him a right to vote, but still allowed him to express his lingering doubts about the party, and Mr. Trudeau himself.

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Ministry prompts worry over Canada's 'non-innovation innovation policy'

Sean Silcoff

Prime Minister Justin Trudeau has been talking about tech as a way to get the Canadian economy out of a funk, but innovation policy experts are worried the federal bureaucracy could be holding him back.

Innovation, Science and Economic Development Minister Navdeep Bains has promised to deliver a new innovation agenda in the coming months, but the briefing book prepared for him by his department is underwhelming, say several experts who have seen the document after it was obtained through Access to Information by The Globe and Mail.

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Jeffrey Simpson: Will taxpayers tolerate a Toronto-on-the-Rideau?

JEFFREY SIMPSON

Politically speaking, Ottawa, the nation’s capital, should be called during the Justin Trudeau years: Toronto-on-the-Rideau.

Of course, the Prime Minister is from Quebec. His ministers come from every province of Canada, a fine reflection of a decentralized country. But behind the scenes, the moving vans have been heading up the highway from Toronto, and especially from the Liberal government at Queen’s Park, to help run the entire country.

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Wynne outraged by colleges in Saudi Arabia, but mum on arms deal

Jane Taber

When it comes to two Ontario colleges operating male-only campuses in Saudi Arabia, Premier Kathleen Wynne is outraged.

She called it “unacceptable” and has dispatched her officials to figure out how the publicly funded colleges – Algonquin College and Niagara College – were able to get away with running school programs that exclude women. She wants to ensure it doesn’t happen in the future.

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Liberals get it right with focus on home care

JEFFREY SIMPSON

The Liberal government has made so many ambitious promises that a mixture of relief and surprise greets the discovery of promises it could have made, but did not.

Take health care, an important area of social policy where the Liberals, being Liberals, made a host of smallish promises. However, several big promises the party did not make are as interesting and important as the ones it did.

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Great pitch from Trudeau at Davos, but why should investors buy it?

JEFFREY SIMPSON

That was quite a sales job Prime Minister Justin Trudeau and a gaggle of his ministers performed in Davos, Switzerland, pitching Canada for plutocrats, movie stars, politicos and assorted others who run the world, or would like to run it.

Canada, Mr. Trudeau preened, is full of bustling entrepreneurship, world-class universities, a thriving biotechnology sector, a high-technology hub – just the place for people and companies with lots of money to invest.

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Tribunal decision a legal and moral victory for First Nations children

ANDRÉ PICARD

On Tuesday, the Canadian Human Rights Tribunal ruled that First Nations children were victims of willful and reckless discrimination by the federal government.

Specifically, it said funding formulas used by Aboriginal Affairs and Northern Development Canada – which resulted in social service programs on reserves receiving funding that was between 22 and 34 per cent less than equivalent programs off-reserve – were a violation of human rights.

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