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Green party leader Elizabeth May unveils their attack ad on attack ads during a press conference on Parliament Hill in Ottawa on Monday, March 7, 2011. Prime Minister Stephen Harper can be seen in the ad being viewed during the realse. (Sean Kilpatrick/The Canadian Press/Sean Kilpatrick/The Canadian Press)
Green party leader Elizabeth May unveils their attack ad on attack ads during a press conference on Parliament Hill in Ottawa on Monday, March 7, 2011. Prime Minister Stephen Harper can be seen in the ad being viewed during the realse. (Sean Kilpatrick/The Canadian Press/Sean Kilpatrick/The Canadian Press)

Greens see red over negative advertising; unveil attack ad on attack ads Add to ...

The Green Party is going on the attack - against attack ads.

Party leader Elizabeth May has unveiled a 30-second spot that spoofs political attack ads, complete with a militaristic drum roll and ominous voice-over.

"Tired of the name-calling? Smear campaigns? Mudslinging? Are you disgusted with the state of Canadian politics?" the narrator intones. "This does not represent our Canada. It doesn't have to be like this."

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Ms. May told a news conference on Monday that the ad is meant to encourage people to reject negative political advertising.

"We do not have to accept a contaminated, vitriolic, rabidly partisan, unpleasant political culture," she said. "It is not part of democracy."

The Greens are spending less than $10,000 to run the ad on the television networks CBC, CTV and TVA. It will air three times this week, although Ms. May didn't rule out a longer run.

The party has also launched a social media campaign on Facebook and Twitter encouraging people to "change the channel" on negative political ads.

Ms. May acknowledges the send-up isn't meant to sway Canadians to vote Green. But she said the party felt compelled to push back against negative ads after a recent round of Conservative attacks on Liberal Leader Michael Ignatieff.

Those since-yanked ads, which featured an out-of-context video clip of Mr. Ignatieff, prompted a torrent of criticism - even from some conservative commentators.

The Conservative Party didn't immediately respond to a request for comment.

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