The Globe and Mail

Go to the Globe and Mail homepage

Jump to main navigationJump to main content

Entry archive:

Welcoming Ottawa Notebook readers to Politics Insider

Chris Hannay

You may have noticed things have been a little quiet around Ottawa Notebook lately. In March, we launched a new subscriber-only politics section called Politics Insider, posting new insights every day and exclusive interviews with key policymakers. Columnist John Ibbitson has been a big part of the new section.

More »

What Olivia Chow loved about the new Jack Layton biopic and what made her squirm

GLORIA GALLOWAY

It’s an odd thing to see one’s life depicted by actors, even for a politician who has spent decades under the public microscope.

But Olivia Chow is undeniably proud of the new television biopic Jack – the story of the last tumultuous months in the life of her husband Jack Layton and their relationship which began 26 years earlier. She wants Canadians to see it.

More »

Deputy to B.C. Premier’s toughest assignment: investigate his boss

Justine Hunter

John Dyble, the deputy minister to B.C. Premier Christy Clark, is expected to wrap up his investigation into the ethnic voter scandal within a week. He hasn’t yet interviewed his boss, and it’s not clear if he ever will.

If only from an optics standpoint, it’s a problematic assignment. The investigation does lead to the premier’s office. Ms. Clark’s deputy chief of staff has already resigned after speaking with Mr. Dyble, but there are several other names still connected with Ms. Clark’s team who are named in the leaked documents.

More »

Helen Clark on 'Canada Inc.': How to turn mining into a blessing for foreign aid

Campbell Clark

There’s rarely been a Canadian aid initiative more controversial than the Harper government’s plan to make some of its foreign aid work hand-in-hand with Canadian mining. But the head of the United Nations Development Program, Helen Clark, says it’s okay to put your money where your mine is.

The Conservatives are eager to re-focus a substantial part of Canadian aid around its so-called “extractive industries,” arguing that building an aid initiative around a business project can create benefits that will be more lasting. But critics have derided it as a PR plan for the overseas interests of Canadian mining companies.

More »

Three reasons tongues are wagging about a Nova Scotia election

Jane Taber

Nova Scotia’s ruling NDP has launched a TV attack ad against its main opponent and changed course to find $100,000 to combat animal cruelty, while Premier Darrell Dexter has dropped 20 pounds – signs that an election is not far off.

The buzz is that Mr. Dexter is poised to try to win another mandate, with some observers saying the writ could drop by Easter.

More »

Why Finance is going back to basics for the 2013 budget

BILL CURRY

Officials at Finance Canada – and economists on Bay Street – are asking themselves some pretty fundamental questions.

Does deficit spending boost or hurt economic growth? Do spending cuts hurt or help the economy?

As crunch time approaches on the 2013 federal budget, there is a lot weighing on getting these answers right.

More »

Politics Today: Mama said vote you out? Murray uses hip hop to boost Liberal leadership bid

Chris Hannay

Politics Today is your daily guide to some of the stories we’re watching in Ottawa and across Canada, by The Globe and Mail’s team of political reporters.

Mama said vote you out

Justin Trudeau isn’t the coolest kid in the Liberal race anymore, now that Joyce Murray’s son has released a rap song for her. The video, from “Baba Brinkman” (real name: Dirk Murray Brinkman Jr.), makes much of her main pitch as the electoral co-operation candidate. It also features what looks like Ms. Murray getting down (though the footage is a little dark). Not that the other campaigns have been idle – have you seen Marc Garneau’s meme-attempting tumblr?

More »

To slash deficit, Ottawa will rely heavily on defence cuts

BILL CURRY

The Conservative government is leaning heavily on the defence budget to dig its way out of deficit.

A closer look at spending plans released Monday shows Chief of Defence Staff Tom Lawson wasn’t just blowing smoke last week when he told a defence conference that the military must do its part to erase the $26-billion federal deficit by 2015.

More »

Politics Today: Tim Hudak’s election itch

Chris Hannay

Politics Today is your daily guide to some of the stories we’re watching in Ottawa and across Canada, by The Globe and Mail’s team of political reporters.

Common Sense Revolution, take two?

Ontario Progressive Conservative Leader Tim Hudak says he’s just itching to fight an election, he said in an interview with the Globe’s Queen’s Park reporter Adrian Morrow. Mr. Hudak, a cabinet minister during Mike Harris’ ’90s government, wants big reforms on the level, it would seem, of his old boss and his “Common Sense Revolution.” One choice quote from the interview: Mr. Hudak wants to fix “the crumbling foundation of government of the last century.”

More »

Politics Today: Why Canada only has eyes for China

Chris Hannay

Politics Today is your daily guide to some of the stories we’re watching in Ottawa and across Canada, by The Globe and Mail’s team of political reporters.

Another reason Canada has eyes only for China

Need any more evidence of just how important Asia is to Canada’s economy? In a milestone no doubt dripping in symbolism, China has overtaken Britain as Canada’s No. 2 trading partner. Trade between the two countries has nearly doubled in the last five years. “It was just a question of time,” one analyst said.

More »

In Alberta, Mulcair sees an opening: provincial right to natural resources

Kelly Cryderman

In Canada’s most staunchly Conservative city, Official Opposition Leader Thomas Mulcair has seized on one of the few areas he might be able to find some common ground with its downtown business crowd – provincial rights in the oil and gas sector.

With the aim of ensuring he has a presence in the hub of Prime Minister Stephen Harper’s political base, the NDP leader wasted no time this week playing to Albertans’ long-held concerns regarding federal meddling in provincial matters. Mr. Mulcair, whose home province of Quebec has also frequently clashed with Ottawa on matters of jurisdiction, told the Calgary Chamber the Harper government’s strategy on foreign investment could erode the constitutionally-enshrined provincial right to manage non-renewable natural resources.

More »

Politics Today: Are the provinces broke?

Chris Hannay

Politics Today is your daily guide to some of the stories we’re watching in Ottawa and across Canada, by The Globe and Mail’s team of political reporters.

Are the provinces broke?

A set of three economic announcements yesterday afternoon – a fiscal update in Alberta, a Throne Speech in Ontario and a budget in B.C. – give John Ibbitson much to worry about. While all three provinces want to balance their books eventually, all seem to be operating with a fair dose of optimism.

More »

Why Hugo Chavez's return cancelled Baird’s trip to Venezeula

Campbell Clark

John Baird has found out first-hand that in Venezuela no one comes before El Presidente.

Venezuelan President Hugo Chavez returned to Caracas on Monday after 10 weeks of cancer treatment in Cuba has set his country, and much of Latin America, abuzz.

But it also seems to have derailed the planned visit by Mr. Baird, who was scheduled to travel to the South American country for the kind of high-level bilateral talks no Canadian foreign minister has had in Caracas since Joe Clark’s trip to the country in 1986.

More »

Keystone argument drowning out bigger energy issues, expert says

Paul Koring

The raucous Keystone XL pipeline argument is drowning out serious discussions about bigger, broader and far more important choices, says David Pumphrey of the Energy and National Security Program at Washington Center for Strategic and International Studies.

“The focus is on things that are iconic rather that fundamental,” to the vexed and vital debate over combatting man-made climate change while maintaining secure energy supplies, he said Tuesday. ”The focus on one pipeline takes away from broader energy issues, which are being seen through the keyhole of Keystone,” he said.

More »

Religious-freedom office shows lack of Conservative hidden agenda

John Ibbitson

This is it? This is the hidden agenda? The God-gays-and-guns crowd should sue.

For as long as Stephen Harper has sought power, his political enemies have warned of a hidden agenda – a combination of economic and social radicalism imported from the Plains states and the Deep South that aimed at transforming Canada into a laissez faire theocracy, and that would be revealed just as soon as absolute power was his.

More »

Politics Today: Who will be Canada's first ambassador for religious freedom?

Chris Hannay

Politics Today is your daily guide to some of the stories we’re watching in Ottawa and across Canada, by The Globe and Mail’s team of political reporters.

Yes, Virginia, there is an office of religious freedoms

The long-awaited (not sure if much anticipated is the right term) office of religious freedoms is expected to be announced today in a news conference with Prime Minister Stephen Harper, Immigration Minister Jason Kenney and International Co-operation Minister Julian Fantino. The trio are expected to finally introduce the new ambassador, a job that apparently wasn’t much sought after – reportedly, at least three prospective candidates declined the offer.

More »

Thomas Mulcair joins Weibo, world’s largest Chinese social network

Chris Hannay

Federal NDP Leader Thomas Mulcair is reaching out to Canada’s Chinese-speaking residents by going to where they (or at least some of them) are: Sina Weibo.

The Chinese-language social network is used by nearly 400 million users worldwide, and while Canada-specific numbers aren’t available, a share of that is likely to come from the one-million-plus speakers of Chinese languages identified in the 2011 census.

More »

Why Canada is sending so many politicians to Myanmar

Campbell Clark

Hoping to see real change come from an opening by Myanmar’s autocratic regime, Canada is sending the long-isolated country a heap of politicians. For a little while.

A delegation of MPs, political advisers, and officials from organizations including the House of Commons and the Auditor-General’s Office will go to Myanmar, formerly called Burma, on Sunday for a week-long trip to talk to reformists there about electoral politics and parliamentary practice.

More »

Politics Today: How shaky is Kathleen Wynne’s grip on power?

Chris Hannay

Politics Today is your daily guide to some of the stories we’re watching in Ottawa and across Canada, by The Globe and Mail’s team of political reporters.

Can Wynne’s government survive?

Ontario Premier Kathleen Wynne is holding a jobs roundtable this morning with newly minted Finance Minister Charles Sousa and Economic Development Minister Eric Hoskins. Ms. Wynne says she’ll incorporate opposition ideas into the Throne Speech next week and the budget that follows. She’ll have to – those two events are the opposition’s first time to bring down the Liberal minority government since Dalton McGuinty prorogued the legislature in the fall.

More »

Politics Today: The link between climate change and Keystone

Chris Hannay

Politics Today is your daily guide to some of the stories we’re watching in Ottawa and across Canada, by The Globe and Mail’s team of political reporters.

What climate change means for Keystone

The U.S. wants something from Canada in exchange for its oil, according to U.S. ambassador David Jacobson: progress on climate change. With President Barack Obama making climate change an issue for his second term, Mr. Jacobson said Ottawa should follow suit.

More »

Video »

Contributors

Steven Chase

Steven Chase has covered federal politics in Ottawa for The Globe since mid-2001, arriving there a few months before 9/11. He previously worked in the paper's Vancouver and Calgary bureaus.

Follow Steven on Twitter @stevenchase

Campbell Clark

Campbell Clark has been a political writer in The Globe and Mail’s Ottawa bureau since 2000.

Follow Campbell on Twitter @camrclark

Bill Curry

A member of the Parliamentary Press Gallery since 1999, Bill Curry worked for The Hill Times and the National Post prior to joining The Globe in Feb. 2005.

Follow Bill on Twitter @curryb

Gloria Galloway

Gloria Galloway has been a journalist for almost 30 years. She has covered every federal election since 1997 and has done several stints in Afghanistan.

Follow Gloria on Twitter @glorgal

Chris Hannay

Chris Hannay is the digital politics editor. He has been a homepage editor and community editor at The Globe.

Follow Chris on Twitter @channay

John Ibbitson

John Ibbitson started at The Globe in 1999 and has been Queen's Park columnist and Ottawa political affairs correspondent.

Follow John on Twitter @JohnIbbitson

Daniel Leblanc

Daniel Leblanc became a full-time reporter in 1998, first at the Ottawa Citizen and then in the Ottawa bureau of The Globe and Mail.

Follow Daniel on Twitter @danlebla

Kim Mackrael

Kim Mackrael has been a reporter for The Globe and Mail since 2011. She joined the Ottawa bureau Sept. 2012.

Top Features

Globe politics on Twitter

Politics on the go

Facebook activity

Most Popular