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In a court sketch reviewed by the U.S. Department of Defense, Omar Khadr is seen on the third day of his sentencing hearing before an American military tribunal in Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, on Oct. 27, 2010. (Janet Hamlin/AP)
In a court sketch reviewed by the U.S. Department of Defense, Omar Khadr is seen on the third day of his sentencing hearing before an American military tribunal in Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, on Oct. 27, 2010. (Janet Hamlin/AP)

Lawrence Cannon denies role in Khadr repatriation deal Add to ...

The Harper government insists it has given no assurance that Omar Khadr can be repatriated after he concludes a plea bargain with U.S. military prosecutors, despite repeated assertions at his trial that a deal is in place.

Both Mr. Khadr's lawyers and U.S. military prosecutors have said a plea bargain where Mr. Khadr admitted to murder and terrorism charges includes a deal for him to serve out much of his sentence in Canada.

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But Foreign Affairs Minister Lawrence Cannon maintains he has given them no reason to say that. "I don't have the slightest idea. I don't know why. You'd have to ask their lawyers," Mr. Cannon said at news conference Thursday.

Mr. Cannon insisted the Canadian government has had no involvement in the plea bargain, and has no agreement with the lawyers. He declined to answer any questions about what might happen to Mr. Khadr after sentencing, stressing the matter is in the hands of a U.S. tribunal.

Mr. Khadr was 15 when he was detained in Afghanistan and now, at 24 and after several years detention at the U.S. naval base in Guantanamo Bay, has admitted he threw the grenade that killed Sergeant Christopher Speer during a 2002 firefight.

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