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Pipe Trouble, a game available on the website of TV Ontario on March 21, 2013. The TVO blog describes “Pipe Trouble” as a “companion ethical game” to adocumentary that deals with local opposition to pipelines and the bombing of pipelines in Peace River, B.C. TVO says the game uses “over-the-top satire to cleverly explore the two sides of the energy extraction debate.”
Pipe Trouble, a game available on the website of TV Ontario on March 21, 2013. The TVO blog describes “Pipe Trouble” as a “companion ethical game” to adocumentary that deals with local opposition to pipelines and the bombing of pipelines in Peace River, B.C. TVO says the game uses “over-the-top satire to cleverly explore the two sides of the energy extraction debate.”

Redford disappointed at online game that shows pipeline bombing Add to ...

Alberta Premier Alison Redford says she is disappointed to see a taxpayer-funded online game showing the bombing of a gas pipeline.

TV Ontario provided money to create the game, called Pipe Trouble, to accompany a documentary about the pipeline debate in British Columbia.

But questions have been raised about the game’s introductory video, which appears to show activists protesting before a pipeline blows up.

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The provincially funded broadcaster says the game is meant to engage people on both sides of the pipeline debate and it’s not taking sides.

But Redford says a taxpayer-funded game depicting the blowing up of pipelines is contrary to Canada’s interests given that the entire country benefits from a strong and diverse energy sector.

Redford says she’s encouraged that Ontario’s governing Liberals are looking into the matter.

Ontario Premier Kathleen Wynne has said that her government isn’t taking a side in the pipeline debate.

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