Go to the Globe and Mail homepage

Jump to main navigationJump to main content

Entry archive:

Bloc Quebecois Leader Gilles Duceppe speaks in his Ottawa office on March 25, 2010. (Blair Gable/Blair Gable for The Globe and Mail)
Bloc Quebecois Leader Gilles Duceppe speaks in his Ottawa office on March 25, 2010. (Blair Gable/Blair Gable for The Globe and Mail)

Robert Silver

Newfoundland separatists get a boost Add to ...

Gilles Duceppe thinks Newfoundland has the right to separate from Canada.

Why does Newfoundland have this right? According to Duceppe its because "Newfoundland was once a nation" - presumably by this he means the Dominion of Newfoundland was self-governing from 1907 to 1934 and in an ode to Braveheart, you just can't take away a nations freedom.

More Related to this Story

This differentiates the Island of Powers from other provinces, according to Duceppe. He was asked specifically about Alberta and since Alberta was never a "nation" - in this context meaning an independant, self-governing land mass - Newfoundland's rights are "different from Alberta" - to quote Duceppe.

My Quebec history is rusty, please remind me how this criteria for the right to secede plays out in Dueppe's favour?

But no matter. Duceppe was partly right in his comments today - Newfoundland has just as much right under both Canadian and international law to separate unilaterally from Canada as Quebec does. Namely, none.

Follow us on Twitter: @GlobePolitics

 

In the know

Most popular video »

Highlights

More from The Globe and Mail

Most Popular Stories