Go to the Globe and Mail homepage

Jump to main navigationJump to main content

A supporter of Sweden's Pirate Party waves the Jolly Roger flag at an election night party as results are announced in EU Parliamentary elections in Stockholm June 7, 2009. A Pirate Party candidate is running in the federal byelection for Winnipeg North. (BOB STRONG/Bob Strong/Reuters)
A supporter of Sweden's Pirate Party waves the Jolly Roger flag at an election night party as results are announced in EU Parliamentary elections in Stockholm June 7, 2009. A Pirate Party candidate is running in the federal byelection for Winnipeg North. (BOB STRONG/Bob Strong/Reuters)

Winnipeg by-election attracts Pirate Party candidate Add to ...

The Pirate Party is making its first foray into Canadian politics.

Jeff Coleman, a 25-year-old small business owner, is carrying the party's banner for the Nov. 29 federal byelection in Winnipeg North.

He is the first member of the international Pirate Party movement to run for office outside of Europe.

The Pirate Party's main issues are consumer rights and privacy in the digital age, and the party recently captured two seats in the European Parliament.

Mr. Coleman is in for a tough battle - he admits the party is not well-known and Winnipeg North has traditionally voted either NDP or Liberal.

The riding was held by New Democrat Judy Wasylycia-Leis until last spring, when she stepped down to run for Winnipeg mayor.

Follow us on Twitter: @GlobePolitics

 

In the know

Most popular videos »

Highlights

More from The Globe and Mail

Most popular