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(MIKE CASSESE/REUTERS)
(MIKE CASSESE/REUTERS)

Five things

Pot-smoking moms and other things you may have missed this week Add to ...

For many of us, Monday to Friday races by in a blur. We know it can be a struggle to delve beyond the big headlines and keep on top of all the interesting stories out there. We’re here to lend a hand: In case you didn’t see them the first time, a collection of stories you may have missed this week on globeandmail.com.

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Mommy wars

Mothers who indulge in marijuana say they are no different than moms who prefer to unwind with a couple glasses of wine. They’re tired of being judged and they want to be heard: the Moms for Marijuana group has garnered close to 20,000 likes on Facebook.

Think like a car salesman

The next time you are in the market for a new car, there’s one site you must visit: carsalesprofessional.com. Here, you will find a playbook of sorts for people who make a living selling cars. The Globe’s Lorraine Sommerfeld took a look at their strategies and tricks.

Ontario town gets into space game

France is getting help for its space-balloon program from an unlikely place: Timmins, Ont. When the country ran out of areas suitable to launch massive helium-filled balloons high into the atmosphere for research, the mining town stepped in to help out. Perhaps this partnership will allow Timmins to one day replace its claim to fame of being the birthplace of Shania Twain with helping reverse the depletion of the ozone layer.

Sleeping their way to success

Canadian Olympians have a secret weapon heading into the London Games: Dr. Charles Samuels and his strict plans for the perfect night’s sleep. Part of his strategy: No Red Bull and no iPhones at night. The athletes, he says, hate him.

You’ve had Indian and Japanese, but what about native cuisine?

In the past couple of years, restaurants focused on aboriginal cuisine have been popping up in Canada. But with dishes such as a deep-fried hot dog topped with fried baloney, some are wondering what is really considered native food.

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