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Sunny Leone is an Indo-Canadian porn actress, businesswoman and model. (Priyam Dhar for The Globe and Mail/Priyam Dhar for The Globe and Mail)
Sunny Leone is an Indo-Canadian porn actress, businesswoman and model. (Priyam Dhar for The Globe and Mail/Priyam Dhar for The Globe and Mail)

Punjabi porn star's progress, and other weekend stories you shouldn't miss Add to ...

Sunny’s new side

A Penthouse Pet, porn star and scion of Sarnia, Ont., Sunny Leone has a new and unlikely role: a household name in India, a country where buying or making pornography is illegal but having a former porn star on reality TV is increasingly okay. “Our parents' generation isn't ready” for a shift in sexual mores, she tells Stephanie Nolen, “but ours is.”

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Exodus redux

This Passover, Rabbi Sharon Shalom is thankful for the thirty years he and other Ethiopian Jews have lived in Israel since they fled drought and religious persecution in Africa in 1982. Rabbi Shalom is working hard to bridge cultural divides in an Israel that still grapples with racism against Ethiopian-Israelis in school boards and the workplace. Patrick Martin reports.

Beyond Rangoon

President Thein Sein and dissident leader Aung San Suu Kyi are making a grand compromise to bring Myanmar back to democracy, in a deal analogous to Nelson Mandela and F.W. de Klerk's demolishing of apartheid, Mark MacKinnon writes. But is the junta's goal to truly bring democracy back, or merely to end sanctions and the country's pariah status?

Capital losses

With the prospect of massive cuts and job losses in the public sector, Ottawa's local businesses and realtors are holding their breath for an economic bloodletting, Carys Mills and Bill Curry report.

Manila answers the call

With a strong supply of young, well-educated workers who speak “American-style” English, the Philippines – once mocked as “the sick man of Asia” – has surpassed India as the continent’s call-centre capital, Andy Hoffman discovers. By 2016, more than a million Filipinos are expected to be working in an industry that’s already transforming the landscape and nightlife of Manila.

Class dismissed

An aging population and declining birth rates are hollowing out Nova Scotia's school system, Jane Taber writes, as education officials shutter schools in anticipation of enrolment levels not seen since the First World War.

Street fighter, too

Bay Street lawyer by day, tae kwon do champion also by day, Andrea St. Bernard is no stranger to holding business meetings with black eyes. Now, Jeff Gray discovers, she's getting ready to represent her native Grenada at the 2012 Olympics.

What about Bob?

Roberto Luongo’s good games are really good, but when he’s off, it’s ugly and difficult to watch, David Ebner writes. Still, coaches from Luongo’s youth and professional career are consistently confident that he can deliver.

I’m just a poor boy, nobody loves me

Robert Wilkinson achieved global fame by singing Bohemian Rhapsody in the back of an RCMP car in Edson, Alta. – but sophisticated song-detecting software and legal manoeuvring meant that record label EMI would profit from its success, not Mr. Wilkinson. Omar El Akkad takes a look at how copyright owners, video hosting services and advertisers divide the spoils of social media.

I’m lookin’ for a fox

Britons widely believe they have more urban foxes than anywhere else in the world, and the public is in a panic over anecdotes about children attacked in their homes. But the urban legends far outweigh the reality that they’re more brazen or numerous than usual, Elizabeth Renzetti discovers.

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