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An open neckline and wide shoulder straps emphasize the collarbone and draw the eye away from the deltoids. But be wary of showing too much cleavage. The flattering U-shaped scoop of this Michael Kors dress strikes the balance between prude and vixen. Michael Kors tank dress, $849 at Holt Renfrew (www.holtrenfrew.com). (Ryan Enn Hughes)
An open neckline and wide shoulder straps emphasize the collarbone and draw the eye away from the deltoids. But be wary of showing too much cleavage. The flattering U-shaped scoop of this Michael Kors dress strikes the balance between prude and vixen. Michael Kors tank dress, $849 at Holt Renfrew (www.holtrenfrew.com). (Ryan Enn Hughes)

WEEKEND READING

The pastime of ogling women, and other weekend stories you shouldn't miss Add to ...

He ain't heavy, he's my mayor

In a province with higher rates of obesity, asthma, diabetes and heavy drinking than the rest of Canada, Summerside’s Mayor Basil Stewart is on a quest to lose weight – and help other Prince Edward Islanders take their health to heart. Jane Taber reports.

Dear Ford Nation: What’s your damage?

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In an open letter to supporters of Toronto Mayor Rob Ford, Marcus Gee asks why they expected anything other than stubbornness and buffoonery – and what Torontonians will do now that they have to live with it.

The visible woman

With women baring skin again in the warm spring, Ian Brown goes girl-watching to meditate on the male gaze, the guilt and the politics behind staring at attractive women in public.

At Viterra, an opportunity lost

In selling out to Swiss commodities trader Glencore, grain handler Viterra Inc. illustrates how Canadians value take-the-money-and-run strategies to building strong industries at home, Eric Reguly argues.

At BioWare, opportunity knocks

The Edmonton headquarters of BioWare, the Canadian video-game company behind Mass Effect 3, isn't much to look at – but it conceals a gaming brain trust and a “great Canadian success story” that is quietly propelling the industry's growth.

Josh Wingrove pays them a visit.

Obamacare’s terrible twos

Barack Obama's health-care law has reached a tumultuous second birthday, and Republicans are still working hard to turn the American public against it. Unless it passes a life-or-death test in the U.S. Supreme Court, the law won't live to see a third year, Konrad Yakabuski writes.

Prose around the globe

Writers-in-residence are coming out of the liberal-arts-college closet, setting up shop in Parisian shop windows, Antarctic research stations and British prisons – and whatever other oddball locale will have them, John Barber discovers.

The brand of violence

Spanish police arrested 22 Romanians on Saturday in an alleged prostitution “clan” that held women captive and branded them with bar-code tattoos on their wrists.

Location, location, location

Borrowing a page from the 100-mile diet’s playbook, the Architecture Foundation of B.C. is looking at projects that use only locally manufactured or recycled material to build homes in Vancouver and there’s $10,000 in prize money at stake for innovative designs. Mark Hume reports.

Scrum of the earth

Langford, B.C., home of the Canadian Rugby Centre of Excellence, wants to make Canada a global rugby powerhouse and engineer a “culture shift” in the Canadian sport by letting future stars train, live and play in one place. David Ebner reports.

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