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OPP officers present the style of boots that they say may help them find the killer of an Orangeville woman.
OPP officers present the style of boots that they say may help them find the killer of an Orangeville woman.

Boots could help find Orangeville woman's killer: police Add to ...

A size 10 or 11 Wind River or Dakota boot could hold the key to finding Sonia Varaschin’s killer, police said Wednesday.

“A friend, co-worker or spouse will hold the key to solving this,” said lead investigator OPP Detective Inspector Mark Pritchard.

Police asked that the public be on the lookout for someone who recently got rid of boots matching the description or purchased replacements, as they may have been worn by Ms. Varaschin’s killer.

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He says the footwear is either Wind River or Dakota brand boots sold exclusively by Mark's Work Wearhouse.

OPP officers present the style of boots that they say may help them find the killer of an Orangeville woman.

Investigators are asking for members of the public to think back to Aug. 30, when the killer may have come home with unexplained stains on his clothes or boots.

A media conference was held Wednesday afternoon at the Best Western Hotel in Orangeville where Det. Insp. Pritchard and Orangeville Police Chief Joseph Tomei released the new information.

Police did not release the cause of death. Police said there’s no reason to believe more than one person was involved in the homicide and there are no signs of forced entry to Ms. Varaschin’s home.

Ontario Provincial Police confirmed on Tuesday that human remains found on the weekend belonged to Ms. Varaschin, a 42-year-old nurse who had gone missing from her Orangeville home early last week.

The remains were found Sunday in a wooded area outside of Caledon.

Ms. Varaschin was reported missing last Monday after she didn’t show up for work. Her blood-stained Toyota Corolla was found in an alleyway behind the Orangeville Town Hall, near Alexandra Park. Blood was also found in her Spring Street residence.

With a report from The Canadian Press

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