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PRINCE EDWARD ISLAND: Catch and shuck your dinner PEI seafood is prized around the world, and it tastes better when you catch it yourself. Join Tranquility Cove fishermen as they haul in their traps, or learn about oysters from three-time Canadian shucking champ John Bil at his Ship to Shore restaurant. (Sheryl Nadler/The Canadian Press/Sheryl Nadler/The Canadian Press)
PRINCE EDWARD ISLAND: Catch and shuck your dinner PEI seafood is prized around the world, and it tastes better when you catch it yourself. Join Tranquility Cove fishermen as they haul in their traps, or learn about oysters from three-time Canadian shucking champ John Bil at his Ship to Shore restaurant. (Sheryl Nadler/The Canadian Press/Sheryl Nadler/The Canadian Press)

extremes

Career highs, career lows Add to ...

1) Most harrowing dining experience/meal ever:

In 1980, the Globe sent me to spend the weekend reviewing a very fancy dining room in a hotel out of town. Immediately upon arrival I came down with the kind of stomach flu that keeps one in the bathroom. Eating all weekend made me wish for danger pay.

2) Most transcendent dining experience/meal ever:

Alain Chapel’s three-star Michelin restaurant in Mionnay, France. I can still taste the fresh briny sweetness of Mr. Chapel’s oysters in gossamer beurre blanc.

3) Closest you ever came to being outed as Joanne Kates while on an assignment:

Until the advent of menus posted online, I used to steal the menus of restaurants I reviewed. At Angelini’s (now defunct) on Jarvis Street, they caught me with the menu and demanded it back. I had no explanation for why I took it.

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