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Ontario Premier Dalton McGuinty. (Colin O'Connor/The Canadian Press)
Ontario Premier Dalton McGuinty. (Colin O'Connor/The Canadian Press)

No apology or inquiry into G20 'secret law,' McGuinty says Add to ...

Premier Dalton McGuinty says public hearings into police actions during the G20 in Toronto will help government understand what to do going forward.

But Mr. McGuinty won't apologize for the secret law the Liberal government passed governing police powers to detain and arrest people during the international summit.

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The premier also says he will not call a public inquiry into police actions during the G20, despite more videos emerging of protesters being beaten and harassed by officers.

Mr. McGuinty says he's already acknowledged the government didn't manage the secret G20 law as well as it should have.

More than 1,100 people were arrested and detained during the G20 weekend in what Ontario Ombudsman Andre Marin called a mass violation of civil rights.

Three days of hearings into the G20 start tonight at Toronto's Metro Hall, billed as an opportunity for the public to offer insight into the role civilian oversight should play in policing major events.

Input from the hearings will form part of a report presented to the body that establishes policies for the Toronto police service.

The review was launched last September by the Toronto Police Services Board and is to examine the board's role in the policing of last summer's summit.

John Morden, a former associate chief justice of Ontario, is conducting the review and is to issue a report and recommendations.

Future hearings are set for June 6 and 13 at the Etobicoke Civic Centre and Scarborough Civic Centre, respectively.

Mr. McGuinty has said it's up to Prime Minister Stephen Harper to call any public inquiry into mass arrests during the G20 weekend.

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