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Exhibition officer Amy Concannon views Canadian artist Tom Thomson's 1917 oil painting The Jack Pine at the Dulwich Picture Gallery in London, October 14, 2011. The gallery hosted Painting Canada: Tom Thomson and the Group of Seven from October 19, 2011 to January 8, 2012. (CHRIS HELGREN/REUTERS)
Exhibition officer Amy Concannon views Canadian artist Tom Thomson's 1917 oil painting The Jack Pine at the Dulwich Picture Gallery in London, October 14, 2011. The gallery hosted Painting Canada: Tom Thomson and the Group of Seven from October 19, 2011 to January 8, 2012. (CHRIS HELGREN/REUTERS)

What’s hot in Toronto, Nov. 3 - 9: Catch the Weeknd this weekend Add to ...

Rolling Stones doc saunters down memory lane

“It’s almost a fairy story,” says Keith Richards, in the new Rolling Stones doc, speaking about the near unbelievability of the band’s history. Unfortunately, Crossfire Hurricane, the Brett Morgen-directed celebration of the Stones’ 50th anniversary, is not so much fairy story as it is half the story.

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The authorized HBO documentary has yet to receive media previews in Canada. However, according to early reviews in the Guardian and the Hollywood Reporter, Crossfire Hurricane doesn’t cover much of the Stones’ last three decades, choosing instead to concentrate on the excellent adventures already chronicled in 1989’s strong 25x5 documentary.

The new film features a reworking of archival footage and previously unseen material as well, with current and past band members voicing their recollections as the well-known narrative unfolds. At one point, former bassist Bill Wyman recalls the “flood of urine” that accompanied the Stones riotous early shows.

As for recent (and more sanitary) developments, the Stones, of course, have reunited for upcoming concerts at London’s O2 Arena (Nov. 25 and 29) and Newark’s Prudential Center (Dec. 13 and 15). More dates are expected to follow in 2013. HBO will broadcast the Dec. 15 show; the band’s greatest-hits collection GRRR! is set for release in North America on Nov. 13. All true.

ART & MUSEUMS

Painting Canada: Tom Thomson and The Group of Seven

Just to be clear: James Coburn was one of the Magnificent Seven; Tom Thomson was one of the Group of Seven. It is the latter who is featured in an exhibit initially assembled for overseas audiences, and it is one of his rare works on canvas – Maple Woods, Bare Trunks (1916) – that now gets its first public showing in Canada. To Jan. 6. $12 to $15. McMichael Canadian Art Collection, 10365 Islington Ave., 905-893-1121.

CONCERTS

Ed Bickert at 80: A Jazz Celebration

The guitarist Ed Bickert was once described by the jazz scholar Mark Miller as a “complete musician,” meaning gracefully inventive melodically, intriguing harmonically and secure rhythmically. On Tuesday, the now-retired icon – meaning Mr. Bickert, no disrespect to the esteemed Mr. Miller – will be feted with a concert by Terry Clarke, Barry Elmes, Jake Langley, Lorne Lofsky and at least one Occhipinti brother. Nov. 6, 7 p.m. $45. Glenn Gould Studio. 250 Front St. W., 416-872-4255.

Keb Mo

Early in his career, he was a running mate of Jefferson Airplane violinist Papa John Creach. Now Keb Mo is a three-time Grammy winner – a long, tall glass of charismatic bluesman. Nov. 8, 8 p.m. $40 to $85. Koerner Hall, 273 Bloor St. W., 416-408-0208.

CLUBS

The Weeknd

The Drake R&B protégé Abel Tesfaye has yet to release a proper album, and perhaps he never will. His first major-label release is to be Trilogy, a forthcoming multidisc package that gathers the material of his three mixed tapes and a few newer tracks. The thin-voiced Toronto artist is a press-shy character of Ethiopian descent and subterranean hype, with a slant on urban music that is sexy, moody and idiosyncratic. Nov. 3 to 5, 9 p.m. $46 (tickets remaining for Nov. 5 only). Sound Academy, 11 Polson St., 1-855-985-5000.

Paying Tribute to Oscar Peterson

The colossus pianist Oscar Peterson is celebrated by Dave Young, a long-time bass-playing associate who has recruited Denzal Sinclaire, Robi Botos, Terry Clarke and Warren Stirzsinger to perform the late great artist’s compositions, some never performed in public previously. Nov. 9, 8:30 p.m. $29.50 to $32.50. Hugh’s Room, 2261 Dundas St. W., 416-531-6604.

THEATRE

War of the Worlds

Forget about the Martians. Sean Cullen is coming! The comic actor stars with Nicholas Campbell in a live recreation of Orson Welles’s radio drama based on H.G. Wells’s frightening futurism. As with last year’s sold-out run, the Art of Time production includes a concert of high-drama soundtrack music – Citizen Kane, Taxi Driver, Psycho and Cape Fear – composed by Bernard Herrman. Nov. 3 (2 and 8 p.m.) and Nov. 4 (2 p.m.). $25 to $59. Enwave Theatre, 231 Queens Quay W., 416-973-4000.

Endgame

Thirteen years after directing Soulpepper’s Dora-winning production of Samuel Beckett’s trash-can classic, Daniel Brooks returns (with original cast member Diego Matamoros) to rework a play about co-dependency and the strategy of life. To Nov. 17. $32 to $68. Young Centre, 55 Mill St., 416-866-8666 or soulpepper.ca.

Speaking in Tongues

Written for four actors (each of whom plays a minimum of two characters), the tense Australian drama involves a missing woman, four marriages, interweaving plot points and an irregular structure that critics have found clever and provocative. In 2001, it was adapted into the film Lantana, starring Anthony LaPaglia, Geoffrey Rush, and Barbara Hershey. To Nov. 24. $22 to $49. Berkeley Street Theatre, 26 Berkeley St., 416-368-3110.

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