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An image from Frank Gehry’s designs for David Mirvish’s project to remake his properties at King Street West and John St. in Toronto. (Courtesy of Gehry International Inc.)
An image from Frank Gehry’s designs for David Mirvish’s project to remake his properties at King Street West and John St. in Toronto. (Courtesy of Gehry International Inc.)

You said it: Readers weigh in on Mirvish’s vision for Toronto’s entertainment district Add to ...

“I’m a fan of Gehry’s (and Mirvish, too) so I feel pretty comfortable with the proposal. In a city that lets Trump build an ugly box, Gehry should be welcomed.”

– Rob Paynter, London

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“Fantastic! We need more unique towers in this city. The theatre is less than 20 years old. Hardly history like the Royal Alexandria.”

– Donny Chew, Toronto

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“The Mirvishes have made fine contributions to the city, but this project will trash that reputation. While David Mirvish has the right to repurpose or replace his building to arrest financial losses, he has no right to alter the zoning and destroy the fabric of the area just in order to make another fortune. The proposed galleries and classrooms – which could be placed anywhere in the downtown – are cover stories for a grotesquely inappropriate development. This is no more ‘desirable’ or ‘exciting’ than a casino.”

– Deanne Taylor, Toronto

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“Does T.O. need another school in the core? Especially one that would compete with U of T and Ryerson. I would have thought a new venue should include a new and improved theatre district concept. Not much left to do downtown with all of the condos eating up prime real estate.”

– Jason Warren, Toronto

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“This is the upward, forward thinking vision for which Toronto has been searching for ages. It reminds one of HongKong‘s graceful skyline and/or the new towers at Ground Zero in Lower Manhattan. One can only hope that it eventually gets done!”

– Dean Corll, Houston Heights

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“Call me crazy, but in my opinion, what this city needs is not more condo buildings. We should be preserving (and celebrating) beautiful old, historic buildings in Toronto. They give the city character. One of the things that drew me to this city in the first place was the old buildings, and the sense of character throughout. So, maybe this is the small town girl in me, but whenever I see a new condo building going up, it makes me sad. I, personally, will never live in a multistorey building and do not see the appeal. From a developer’s standpoint, it’s a dream come true and money in the bank, but the whole idea of “out with the old and in with the new” just grosses me out. New is not always better.”

– Julie VanderKloet, Toronto

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“The last thing we need on this stretch of King Street is three more towering condo buildings. Toronto has too much condo development going on as it is, and the traffic situation downtown can most charitably be described as challenging. Adding population density to that part of King Street is utterly unhelpful in terms of traffic congestion.”

– Natalia Witkowsky, Etobicoke

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“Try proposing a development structure that leaves the theatre in place, that would be a reasonable compromise. As the city continues to grow and expand the demand for greater theatre venue space will also grow. Moreover, the value of the adjacent condo’s would surely be higher when they are positioned next to a beautiful theatre.”

– Jonathan Lawrence, Mississauga

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“I like it the way it is, with the relatively low rise buildings. Roy Thomson Hall, David Picault Square, St. Andrew’s Church and the theatres. It’s human and welcoming. I am not anti-skyscraper, but one of the things that makes Toronto so appealing is the mix of low-rise and high. Eighty-five stories will wreck the street. Next thing you know an architect will figure out how to make RTH the “atrium” of a new 100 storey tower – built around it!”

– Mary Jane Wood, Burlington

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“This the dumbest thing I have ever heard! Where is the neirbourhood scale? 80 to 85 stories!! This is not development, this is just another example of a mindless development being pushed by a property owner and/or developer with more greed than vision.”

– Sean Leyne, Toronto

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“It’s a sad day for Canadian theatre, the Princess of Wales is an outstanding theatre and it will be greatly missed. The new Gehry is a project that has great merit and could transform the district, create jobs and possibly help the cultural heart of Toronto and the country, but you really need to include a theatre in the design.”

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