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International Criminal Court (ICC) chief prosecutor Luis Moreno-Ocampo speaks to the media after delivering a report to the United Nations Security Council on the situation in Libya May 4, 2011 in New York City. Moreno-Campo said the court has discovered evidence that Moammar Gadhafi's regime has committed crimes against humanity during the conflict in Libya and the ICC is seeking three arrest warrants. (Mario Tama/Getty Images)
International Criminal Court (ICC) chief prosecutor Luis Moreno-Ocampo speaks to the media after delivering a report to the United Nations Security Council on the situation in Libya May 4, 2011 in New York City. Moreno-Campo said the court has discovered evidence that Moammar Gadhafi's regime has committed crimes against humanity during the conflict in Libya and the ICC is seeking three arrest warrants. (Mario Tama/Getty Images)

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A court to prosecute the worst crimes, but who is in the docks? Add to ...

The International Criminal Court, or ICC, is an independent and permanent court that came in to effect in 2002, based on a treaty signed by countries. As of February 2012, there are 120 signed up to the treaty, but many others like the United States, India, China and Russia have not signed up.The court prosecutes only the most serious crimes: genocide, crimes against humanity and war crimes. And it can only open investigations and prosecute crimes committed after 2002. So which countries are being investigated and how many indictments have led to the arrest and prosecution of alleged war criminals at the court in the Hague, Netherlands?

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