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Ted Engelmann, left, helps Yamilet Ortega, 3, second from left, and Kimberly Hernandez, 7, light candles, Saturday, July 21, 2012, at a memorial near the movie theater in Aurora, Colo. where a gunman killed at least 12 people and wounded dozens of others Friday in one of the deadliest mass shootings in recent U.S. history. (Ted S. Warren/AP)
Ted Engelmann, left, helps Yamilet Ortega, 3, second from left, and Kimberly Hernandez, 7, light candles, Saturday, July 21, 2012, at a memorial near the movie theater in Aurora, Colo. where a gunman killed at least 12 people and wounded dozens of others Friday in one of the deadliest mass shootings in recent U.S. history. (Ted S. Warren/AP)

A look at the lives of Colorado’s theatre shooting victims Add to ...

Her aunt, Jenny Zakovich, 57, of South Milwaukee, Wis., said Ms. Medek and her father were both huge Green Bay Packers fans.

Veronica Moser-Sullivan

The youngest of the victims killed in the attack was Veronica Moser-Sullivan.

She had just learned to swim, and at age 6, she was a “great little girl, excited about life,” her great-aunt Annie Dalton said. “She should be at 6 years old.”

Her mother, Ashley Moser, remains hospitalized in critical condition with gunshot wounds to her neck and abdomen. She has been in and out of consciousness and asking for her daughter during moments of lucidity.

“Nobody can tell her about it,” Ms. Dalton said. “She is in critical condition, but all she's asking about is her daughter.”

Alex Sullivan

Alex Sullivan's family called him “their real life super hero,” and he was at “The Dark Knight Rises” premiere celebrating his 27th birthday and his first wedding anniversary.

“Alex was a gentle giant, known and loved by so many. He always had a glowing smile on his face and he made friends with everyone. Alex enjoyed all sorts of movies, was an avid comic book geek and loved the New York Mets,” the family said in a statement.

Mr. Sullivan had a warm smile and an innocence that endeared him to people, said Shelly Fradkin, whose son Brian was good friends with Mr. Sullivan.

She sat next to a makeshift memorial Friday near the theatre where an oversized birthday card with a photo of a smiling Mr. Sullivan was displayed.

“He's amazing. He was just a big teddy bear. Great hugs,” she said.

She said Mr. Sullivan was such a big movie fan that he took jobs at theaters just to see movies.

Ms. Fradkin and her son spent an “excruciating” day trying to find Mr. Sullivan before learning of his death, she said.

“We're shocked. We're numb. We're sick,” she said. “Our hearts are broken, and we're crushed.”

Alexander C. Teves

Alexander C. Teves, 24, of Phoenix, earned a master's degree in counseling psychology in June from University of Denver.

He was a lovable person who made friends quickly and had a lot of them, said his grandfather, Carlo Iacovelli of Barnegat, N.J.

As a boy, Mr. Teves moved from New Jersey to Phoenix with his parents. Mr. Iacovelli and his wife wintered there and spent a lot of time with him.

“He was what you might call an ideal grandson,” Mr. Iacovelli said. “He was a fun guy. He loved to eat.”

Mr. Teves was planning to become a psychiatrist, his grandfather said.

“He had a lot to look forward to,” Mr. Iacovelli said.

Rebecca Ann Wingo

Rebecca Ann Wingo had started a job several months ago as a customer relations representative at a mobile medical imaging company. She was 32.

Shannon Dominguez, who worked with Ms. Wingo on weekends, said she was friendly with everyone and always seemed to be in a good mood.

“I didn't really know her well but she had a really bubbly personality,” Ms. Dominguez said. “She was a pretty happy person. She just never really seemed ... like with work, she never got irritated. She was pretty happy to be here.”

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