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Abigail Carter touches her husband's name (Arron Dack) with her children Olivia Dack and Carter Dack during an unveiling of a plaque in Ottawa on Sunday, Sept. 15, 2002. The plaque is in honor of the Canadians who died during the attacks on the World Trade Centre in New York on Sept. 11, 2001. (Jonathan Hayward/The Canadian Press/Jonathan Hayward/The Canadian Press)
Abigail Carter touches her husband's name (Arron Dack) with her children Olivia Dack and Carter Dack during an unveiling of a plaque in Ottawa on Sunday, Sept. 15, 2002. The plaque is in honor of the Canadians who died during the attacks on the World Trade Centre in New York on Sept. 11, 2001. (Jonathan Hayward/The Canadian Press/Jonathan Hayward/The Canadian Press)

Canada's 9/11 families spent last decade learning how to live with loss Add to ...

David Barkway — The 34-year-old executive with BMO Nesbitt Burns in Toronto was in the office of Cantor Fitzgerald on the 105th floor of the north tower. He sent an electronic message to his Toronto colleagues, saying, “We need help ... This is not a joke.” Mr. Barkway was in New York with his wife, Cindy, for a three-day business trip just days after celebrating his birthday. After his death, the avid golfer nicknamed Barky was remembered by friends in Toronto as a bright and thoughtful leader who loved fine cigars, high-tech stereos and trips to the cottage. The couple has two young sons, one who was born in January 2002 and named David after his father. The David Barkway Memorial Scholarship in Economics was set up by the Department of Economics at Carleton University to honour his memory and life and is awarded to a high-achieving fourth year economics student.

Ken Basnicki — The 48-year-old father of two was in the north tower attending a conference for BEA Systems, the software firm he worked for in Toronto. He was last heard from at 8:55 a.m. in a cellphone call to his mother from an office on the 106th floor. His wife, Maureen, a former flight attendant grounded in Germany at the time, said he had a boundless passion for golf, skiing, snowboarding and his Harley Davidson motorcycle. In the five years since her husband's death, Maureen has started the Canadian Coalition Against Terror and is lobbying for legislation that would allow Canadians to sue countries or groups that support terrorism.

Jane Beatty — A native of Britain, Ms. Beatty, 53, lived in Ontario for more than 20 years before moving to the United States to work as a technical supervisor at Marsh and McLennan Cos. Inc. in the World Trade Center's north tower. She worked on the 96th floor of the north tower and phoned her husband Bob just before the plane hit. Three weeks before she died, she celebrated her fifth anniversary of surviving breast cancer. She had two grown sons.

Joseph Collison — Mr. Collison was born in Toronto in 1951 and moved to New York City more than 15 years ago. He was on the 102nd floor of the north tower, where he worked in the mail room of Kidder, Peabody & Co., according to his sister-in-law, Janet Collison. He was buried in Mississauga next to his parents. At the time of his death, Mr. Collison, who was not married, was hoping to adopt a young boy in New York whom he cared for.

Cynthia Connolly — Ms. Connolly, 40, transferred from insurance firm Aon Corp.’s Montreal offices to New York in 1999. She and her husband, Donald Poissant, married in 1998 and lived in Metuchen, N.J., with their Airedale-German shepherd, Shadow, and pet cat, Obi. People in her neighbourhood fondly remembered Ms. Connolly, four-foot-three, struggling to control her dog as they walked through the area. Her mother recalled her as “loving and caring,” always showing a soft spot for stray animals who she would bring home when she was a child.

Arron Dack — The 39-year-old father of two was known to his family and friends for his ability to succeed in anything he tried. Mr. Dack was born in England, but moved to Canada with his parents in 1970. The senior executive with Encompys was attending a conference in the north tower of the World Trade Center when the first plane hit. He called his wife Abigail Carter and calmly asked her to call 911 since he thought a small bomb had gone off. Ms. Carter, who lived in New Jersey at the time but has since moved to Seattle, started two support groups for widows. He is survived by two children, Olivia and Carter.

Frank Joseph Doyle — The 39-year-old Detroit native was married to Kimmy Chedel of St. Adele, Que. He was an American citizen whose parents were from the Ottawa valley, and he had a home in Canada. The executive vice-president of Keefe, Bruyette and Woods left two children, Zoe and Garrett. Mr. Doyle, a gifted athlete who did a triathlon the summer before he died, was living in New Jersey and working on the 89th floor of the second tower. “He said, ‘You have to promise me every day for the rest of their lives you'll tell Zoe and Garrett how much I love them, and I didn't realize that he was saying goodbye, he was just so brave and so strong,”’ said Ms. Chedel. She created “Team Frank” in her husband's honour — a collection of family and friends who participate in athletic events worldwide. Mr. Doyle's friends from Bowdoin College also established a memorial scholarship in his name for outstanding athletes.

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