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FILE - In this Saturday, Sept. 29, 2007, file photo, A 43 year old Congolese patient, center, who has been confirmed to have Ebola hemorrhagic fever, following laboratory tests, is comforted by Medecins Sans Frontieres (Doctors without Borders) nurse Isabel Grovas, left, and Doctor Hilde Declerck, right, in Kampungu, Kasai Occidental province, Congo. In the four decades since the Ebola virus was first identified in Africa, treatment hasn’t changed much. There are no licensed drugs or vaccines for the deadly disease. A number are being developed, but none have been rigorously tested in humans. One experimental treatment, though, was tried this week in an American aid worker sick with Ebola, according to the U.S-based group that she works for in Liberia. Without a specific treatment, doctors and nurses focus on easing the disease’s symptoms _ fever, headache, vomiting and diarrhea _ and on keeping patients hydrated and comfortable. (AP Photo/WHO, Christopher Black, File)
FILE - In this Saturday, Sept. 29, 2007, file photo, A 43 year old Congolese patient, center, who has been confirmed to have Ebola hemorrhagic fever, following laboratory tests, is comforted by Medecins Sans Frontieres (Doctors without Borders) nurse Isabel Grovas, left, and Doctor Hilde Declerck, right, in Kampungu, Kasai Occidental province, Congo. In the four decades since the Ebola virus was first identified in Africa, treatment hasn’t changed much. There are no licensed drugs or vaccines for the deadly disease. A number are being developed, but none have been rigorously tested in humans. One experimental treatment, though, was tried this week in an American aid worker sick with Ebola, according to the U.S-based group that she works for in Liberia. Without a specific treatment, doctors and nurses focus on easing the disease’s symptoms _ fever, headache, vomiting and diarrhea _ and on keeping patients hydrated and comfortable. (AP Photo/WHO, Christopher Black, File)

Distribution map of Ebola cases, 1976-2014 Add to ...

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, a federal agency under the U.S. Department of Health, maintains a record of all known cases and outbreaks of Ebola Hemorrhagic Fever, listed in chronological order, starting from 1976. Each case includes the year, location, Ebola subtype, reported number of human cases and fatalities.

ClickTap any marker to see more information.

1. Yambuku, Democratic Republic of Congo, 1976

280 deaths of 318 reported cases of Zaire ebolavirus. Occurred in Yambuku and surrounding area. Disease was spread by close personal contact and by use of contaminated needles and syringes in hospitals/clinics. This outbreak was the first recognition of the disease, killing 88% of infected.

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2. Nzara, South Sudan, 1976

151 deaths of 284 reported cases of Sudan ebolavirus. Occurred in Nzara, Maridi and the surrounding area. Disease was spread mainly through close personal contact within hospitals. Many medical care personnel were infected.

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3. Tandala, Democratic Republic of Congo, 1977

1 death of 1 reported cases of Zaire ebolavirus

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4. Nzara, South Sudan, 1979

22 deaths of 34 reported cases of Sudan ebolavirus

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5. Mekouka, Gabon, 1994

31 deaths of 52 reported cases of Zaire ebolavirus

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6. Tai Forest, Ivory Coast, 1994

0 deaths of 1 reported cases of Zaire ebolavirus

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7. Kikwit, Dem. Rep. of Congo, 1995

250 deaths of 315 reported cases of Zaire ebolavirus. Occurred in Kikwit and surrounding area. Traced to index case-patient who worked in forest adjoining the city. Epidemic spread through families and hospitals, killing 81% of infected.

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8. Mayibout and Booue, Gabon, 1996

66 deaths of 97 reported cases of Zaire ebolavirus

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9. Johannesburg, South Africa, 1996

1 death of 2 reported cases of Zaire ebolavirus

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10. Gulu, Uganda, 2000

224 deaths of 425 reported cases of Zaire ebolavirus

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11. Libreville, Gabon, 2001

53 deaths of 65 reported cases of Zaire ebolavirus

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12. Not specified, Republic of Congo, 2001

43 deaths of 57 reported cases of Zaire ebolavirus

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13. Mbomo, Republic of Congo, 2002

128 deaths of 143 reported cases of Zaire ebolavirus

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14. Mbomo, Republic of Congo, 2003

29 deaths of 35 reported cases of Zaire ebolavirus

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15. Yambio, South Sudan, 2004

7 deaths of 17 reported cases of Zaire ebolavirus

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16. Luebo, Democratic Republic of Congo, 2007

187 deaths of 264 reported cases of Zaire ebolavirus

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17. Bundibugyo, Uganda, 2007

37 deaths of 149 reported cases of Bundibugyo ebolavirus

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18. Luebo, Democratic Republic of Congo, 2008

15 deaths of 32 reported cases of Zaire ebolavirus

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19. Luwero District, Uganda, 2011

1 death of 1 reported cases of Sudan ebolavirus

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20. Kibaale District, Uganda, 2012

4 deaths of 11 reported laboratory-confirmed cases of Sudan ebolavirus

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21. Isiro Health Zone, Democratic Republic of Congo, 2012

13 deaths of 36 reported laboratory-confirmed cases of Bundibugyo ebolavirus

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22. Luwero District, Uganda, 2012

3 deaths of 6 reported laboratory-confirmed cases of Sudan ebolavirus

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23. Guinea, Sierra Leone, Liberia, 2014

574 deaths of 1009 reported laboratory-confirmed cases of Zaire ebolavirus, to date. Ongoing outbreak across Guinea, northern Liberia, and now eastern Sierra Leone. Numbers of patients is constantly evolving due to the on-going investigation. 

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Source: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

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