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This 1-cent 1856 British Guiana stamp already set three price records for the sale of a single stamp. It is poised to set a fourth when it is offered at auction by Sotheby's on Tuesday, June 17, 2014. (Sotheby's/Associated Press)

This 1-cent 1856 British Guiana stamp already set three price records for the sale of a single stamp. It is poised to set a fourth when it is offered at auction by Sotheby's on Tuesday, June 17, 2014.

(Sotheby's/Associated Press)

This stamp is set to become the most expensive tiny thing in the world – again Add to ...

A 1-cent postage stamp from a 19th century British colony in South America could become the world’s most valuable stamp — again.

It has broken the auction record for a single stamp three times in its long history.

Sotheby’s predicts the 1856 British Guiana One-Cent Magenta could bring between $10-million and $20-million (U.S.) when it goes on the auction block Tuesday. That would make it the most expensive object in the world, by size and weight, according to Sotheby’s.

Measuring 1 inch-by-1 1/4 inches, the One-Cent Magenta hasn’t been on public view since 1986. It’s the only major stamp absent from the British Royal Family’s private Royal Philatelic Collection.

Smithsonian National Postal Museum Director Allen Kanes says “you’re not going to find anything rarer than this.”

An 1855 Swedish stamp currently holds the auction record for a single stamp. It sold for $2.3-million (U.S.) in 1996.

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