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Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump makes a punching motion after returning to the stage following a security incident, where he was hustled off the stage by security agents, during a campaign rally in Reno, Nevada, U.S. November 5, 2016. (CARLO ALLEGRI/REUTERS)
Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump makes a punching motion after returning to the stage following a security incident, where he was hustled off the stage by security agents, during a campaign rally in Reno, Nevada, U.S. November 5, 2016. (CARLO ALLEGRI/REUTERS)

u.s. election 2016

Secret Service says no gun involved in Trump rally commotion Add to ...

No weapon was involved in a commotion that briefly disrupted Donald Trump’s Saturday night rally and caused agents to hustle Trump from the stage, the Secret Service said.

The Republican presidential nominee had been speaking to supporters for a while when a disturbance broke out in the crowd close to the podium. Two Secret Service agents quickly surrounded Trump, then hustled him away.

In a statement, the Secret Service said a person in front of the stage had shouted “Gun!” but that no weapon was found after a search of the person and the immediate area. The person was apprehended, but officials did not identify the person or disclose whether the person had been charged with a crime.

The Secret Service said an investigation into the incident was ongoing.

Upon his return to the stage a few minutes later, Trump thanked the Secret Service and told the crowd: “Nobody said it was going to be easy for us. But we will never be stopped. Never ever be stopped.”

The Secret Service statement noted that magnetometers are used at presidential campaign sites.

“All general public attending these events must go through a magnetometer screening prior to entering a protected area,” the agency said.

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