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South Korea is about to construct the world’s first ‘invisible; building – a 450-metre tower that, with the touch of a button, will appear to vanish into thin air. Last week, South Korea approved construction of the ‘Infinity Tower’ near Incheon airport outside of Seoul (GDS/GDS)
South Korea is about to construct the world’s first ‘invisible; building – a 450-metre tower that, with the touch of a button, will appear to vanish into thin air. Last week, South Korea approved construction of the ‘Infinity Tower’ near Incheon airport outside of Seoul (GDS/GDS)

World’s first ‘invisible’ building to be completed by 2014 Add to ...

South Korea is about to construct the world’s first “invisible” building – a 450-metre tower that, with the touch of a button, will appear to vanish into thin air.

Last week, South Korea approved construction of the ‘Infinity Tower’ near Incheon airport outside of Seoul.

The building achieves its “invisible” effect through an elaborate system of cameras and projection screens designed to camouflage the tower. Strategically-placed cameras outside of the tower will be used to capture real-time images of the building’s surroundings – the sky, mostly – and those images projected off of the tower’s LED facade.

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The tower is expected to be completed by 2014.

“Instead of symbolizing prominence as another of the world’s tallest and best towers, it sets itself apart by celebrating the global community rather than focusing on itself,” says a description of the building on the architecture firm GDS’ website.

“The tower subtly demonstrates Korea’s rising position in the world by establishing its most powerful presence through diminishing its presence. Korea will have a unique position of having the “best” tower by having an “anti-tower.”

Kim Hee-jae, who is in charge of the tower’s architectural planning at Korea Land and Housing Corporation (the state-owned backer of the project), told the Wall Street Journal that the “invisible” illusion will only be used during certain hours of the day and from certain angles to prevent risks to air traffic.

Even when the effect is turned on, Mr. Kim said, the building’s red aircraft warning lights will have to remain on to keep pilots safely away.

 

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