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In this Oct. 21, 2010 file photo, Syrian President Bashar Assad smiles as he shakes hands with Venesuela's President Hugo Chafez, not seen, at the Syrian presidential palace, in Damascus, Syria. Syrian President Bashar Assad has warned that a western intervention in Syria will lead to an "earthquake" that "would burn the whole region." In an interview with Britain's Sunday Telegraph, Assad said that such an intervention against his regime will cause "another Afghanistan." (Hussein Malla/AP/Hussein Malla/AP)
In this Oct. 21, 2010 file photo, Syrian President Bashar Assad smiles as he shakes hands with Venesuela's President Hugo Chafez, not seen, at the Syrian presidential palace, in Damascus, Syria. Syrian President Bashar Assad has warned that a western intervention in Syria will lead to an "earthquake" that "would burn the whole region." In an interview with Britain's Sunday Telegraph, Assad said that such an intervention against his regime will cause "another Afghanistan." (Hussein Malla/AP/Hussein Malla/AP)

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'Nothing can save Assad,' Syrian activist tells Globe Add to ...

Diplomats continue pressing for a peace deal as the death toll rises in Syria.

On Friday, Turkish Foreign Minister Ahmet Davutoglu called on Syrian President Bashar al-Assad to accept an Arab League proposal that would allow independent observers into the country. That comes after talks this week between the head of the Arab League and senior Iraqi officials about using their influence to push Damascus into a settlement.

But is any negotiated solution still possible, after thousands have been killed? Listen to this one-minute audio clip from a Syrian activist in Homs, a hotbed of resistance.

Speaking to The Globe and Mail, the 28-year-old resident cast doubt on whether the situation can be resolved with anything less than Mr. Assad’s prosecution and removal from office.





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