The Globe and Mail
Report on Small Business -

December 6, 2016

Jobs for teenagers might be subject to new restrictions - Plus: It’s a David-vs.-Goliath story for little Canadian hockey-gear maker

Bill Allen is a more than a little worried the New Brunswick government is considering making some major changes to its Employment Standards Act that could put new restrictions on the amount of time teens can work and how young they can be to work at all. “If the government legislates this as is, there would be a lot of kids in the quick service business we wouldn’t be able to employ,” says Mr. Allen, who owns five Swiss Chalet and Harvey’s restaurants, and one Big Stop Travel Plaza in the Maritimes. Read story.

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It’s a David-vs.-Goliath story for little Canadian hockey-gear maker

Boddam Custom Hockey also has supplied North America’s National Lacrosse League with goalie equipment exclusively for the past 12 years. But the Canadian brand is struggling to reach a new wave of young hockey players and compete with the big manufacturers including Bauer, the biggest name in the sport, and CCM. Both have more marketing prowess, and players in the NHL are more likely to use CCM or Bauer gear rather than a smaller name. Read story.

Transfer times thwart robo-advisers

The popularity of robo-advisers is on the rise in Canada, but some companies say slow transfer times are creating an impediment to their business model, which touts efficiency and speed through online methods. According to Canadian robo-adviser firm Wealthsimple, it takes an average of 18 days for a financial institution to transfer over clients’ funds after receiving the request. There’s also an average transfer fee of $101. Read story.

Glow-in-the-dark rope a lifesaver at sea, Halifax maker says

When Mr. Moore heard about a Swiss-made synthetic, luminescent fibre, a light bulb went on. He secured the sole rights to that material and, along with his father, developed a buoyant rope that glows in the dark. With it, he’s hoping to propel his company, Canada Rope and Twine Ltd., to commercial success while saving lives at the same time. Read story.

Seven great habits of the most successful people

Many people wonder how they can become highly successful, not realizing that they hold within them everything they need to achieve all of the success they desire. Successful people are where they are today because of their habits.  Habits determine 95% of a person’s behavior. Read story.

Small business news from around the web

Why you should encourage your employees to brag more

It’s not just about self-actualization: employers can benefit greatly by institutionalizing a boastful culture, too. When everyone is forthcoming with their achievements, it lessens the likelihood managers will disproportionately favour only natural show-offs. Read story.

How to generate new business for your startup

Don’t try to be something to everyone, or you run the risk of not reaching anyone. The stories that an 18-year-old city-dweller is interested in will be hugely different from those a 60-year-old living in the countryside will care about. Pick a very particular market. Read story.

B.C. film and construction ready for Express Entry boom

Vancouver’s film and construction industries are hoping to benefit from the federal government’s recent changes to the Express Entry system. The program ranks applicants based on various factors including age, language proficiency, education and work experience, and then matches them with Canadian companies. The new rules came into effect November 19 and make it easier for certain highly skilled workers already living in Canada, as well as international students who have completed post-secondary education in Canada, to gain permanent residency. Read story.

Shoes.com struggles to keep up growth pace

Vancouver-based Shoes.com has run into a speed bump after years of fast growth and lofty growth projections. Not only has the online shoe seller laid off hundreds of staff in the past year but it has also fielded multiple lawsuits, mostly from suppliers. Read story.

Compiled by Sarah Efron.

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