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Marijuana, seen in a licensed Smiths Falls, Ont., grow room in January of 2016. (Dave Chan/The Globe and Mail)

Marijuana, seen in a licensed Smiths Falls, Ont., grow room in January of 2016.

(Dave Chan/The Globe and Mail)

What readers think

April 18: Where there’s smoke, there’s marijuana. Plus, other letters to the editor Add to ...

Letters to the Editor should be exclusive to The Globe and Mail. Include your name, address and daytime phone number. Try to keep letters to fewer than 150 words. Letters may be edited for length and clarity. To submit a letter by e-mail, click here: letters@globeandmail.com

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Pot shots

Fifteen years from now, there will be a class-action lawsuit against the federal government for legalizing marijuana (Liberals Table Historic Marijuana Legislation, April 14). It will be brought about by all the people who will be hurt by smoking marijuana. It can harm your health and is linked to depression.

If you want to get a good perspective on legalizing marijuana, visit the rehabilitation centres and interview the drug addicts who are trying to get free of drug addiction. They say it is not a good idea.

Vincent Heffernan, Toronto

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While I do understand the reasoning behind legalizing marijuana, I believe that the public health risks outweigh the legislative benefits. It is an intoxicant and causes effects similar to alcohol, and can cause impairment of both perception and motor skills. These faculties need to be functional to ensure safe driving, for example.

Legalizing marijuana may lead to greater incidents of accidents – and possible deaths – because of intoxication. We are already working toward mitigating road deaths related to alcohol. Adding marijuana to the mix poses an additional liability to public safety.

Sohail Temoor, Kitchener, Ont.

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There have been plenty of articles lately about the legalization of marijuana yet nobody seems to be talking about where people will be allowed to smoke. I smell it nearly every time I’m walking in my neighbourhood and it’s not even legal yet.

We have made such great progress over the past 20 years limiting cigarette smoke. Remember when people used to be able to smoke in restaurants and on patios? Most of us are so happy to live in a nearly smoke-free environment.

Now I am very worried that when pot is fully legalized, the smell will be everywhere.

I presume there will be limitations similar to using alcohol, but that won’t be enough to keep the smell out of my airwaves. I’m fine with pot being legalized. I just don’t want to have to smell it or breathe the second-hand smoke.

Donna Spreitzer, Toronto

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Sense of belonging

Though he may be lapsed in his own mind, Cathal Kelly has learned the importance of attendance at mass to one’s sense of belonging in a real community (Even For A Teen With A Mohawk And An Attitude, Church Was About Belonging , April 15). This is true no matter where that community may be or how recent your arrival in it.

During all our years of travel over the globe, my wife and I have always made a point of finding a local mass to attend to reconnect with our faith and temper our cultural and linguistic disorientation there. At these masses, the sign of peace shared with strangers, where we actually touch someone with goodwill, is never more comforting and it confirms we share belonging and community in those faraway places. Mr. Kelly apparently finds something similar when he returns on holy days and confession. Like him, we suspect, this is only one aspect of the benefits we have received from the church.

Sean Michael Kennedy, Oakville, Ont.

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Christian-centric

Re Anti-Muslim Rhetoric Escalates In Peel (April 15): I’ve been following this story with interest and increasing anger. Given that the school year and school holidays are based on the Christian calendar, I find it interesting that some parents are saying that schools are no place for religion, and calling for an end to religious accommodations in schools.

If parents are so worried about religious accommodations disrupting learning, they should also be calling for an end to accommodating Christmas and Easter – both of which are Christian holidays and cause disruption to student learning.

Since this isn’t the case, it suggests to me this is not about religious accommodations or the best interests of students at all. Rather, it suggests this is about Islamophobia. Parents are actually perfectly happy to have schools accommodate for religion – as long as it’s their religion.

Shulamit Heisler, Toronto

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Through child’s eyes

What is often lost in the conversation about court delays is the impact on a child’s life of delayed resolution in child protection matters (Ontario Judge Seeks To Cut Court Delays In Cases Of Child Protection, April 17).

If a 30-year-old faces an 18-month delay of a finding in a criminal matter, that is 5 per cent of that person’s life. If a two-year-old faces a 18-month delay of resolution in a Family Court matter, that is 75 per cent of that person’s life.

Factor in the vulnerability of a developing brain and the individual and societal cost of delay is extremely high.

Trish Crowe, Kingston

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Sexism simmers

Jen Agg speaks of an “internalized misogyny” that’s ubiquitous in restaurant kitchens (Why Female Cooks Stay Out Of the Kitchen, April 17). The scope of this mindset can be seen everywhere in public life.

Certain female politicians have been harassed with death threats and obscenities. In the military and RCMP, there are countless accounts of harassment. In the media, women’s sports have scant coverage in comparison to male sports. In police stations, several accounts of violence against women have been dismissed as “unfounded.” Even religions worship male gods and deny women the priesthood.

The question is why the silence of most men to change all this is so palpable.

Diane Sullivan, Toronto

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Bubble solution

If you go into a store and see an item with a price tag of $9.99, is the cashier allowed to tell you that she now wants $14.99 for that item?

One way to significantly dampen the feeding frenzy in home prices would be to make it illegal to accept more than the stated list price of a home (This Is Not Going To End Well, April 15). The owner then would have to decide what he or she really wants and stick with that listed price, just like everyone else who has things for sale.

The ridiculous bidding wars would end instantly.

Frank Foulkes, Toronto

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Checks, no balance

For anyone unfamiliar with hockey, the four pictures in The Globe and Mail’s Sports section on Monday give an unfortunate and misconstrued view of the game. Only brutal body contact is shown and there is no indication of beautiful passing and cleverly set-up goals. What a shame it has come to this.

Diane Bethune, Ottawa

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